Roofing Contractor inSummers Corner, SC.

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If Your Roof Needs Fixin' It's Time to Call Hixon's

Local Roofers Summers Corner, SC

When it comes to protection, few features are as important as the roof above your head. Your roof is much more than just a hat for your house - it keeps outside elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind outside so you and your family can stay comfortable and dry inside. A properly maintained roof also helps protect your home's structural integrity, keeps critters out, and insulates your home during cold months. With all that said, it's easy to see why your roof plays such a crucial role in your everyday life. That's why, when your roof needs maintenance or replacement, you need to work with experienced, trustworthy roofers in Summers Corner, SC.

Hixon's Roofing has been Summers Corner's go-to contractor for new roof installations and repairs for nearly three decades. As locals in the Summers Corner community, we pride ourselves on honesty, hard work, and being a business that you can count on consistently. There's no secret as to why our company is successful. The bottom line is that we do right by our customers and treat them the way we would like our own family to be treated. That's why, when you hire Hixon's Roofing, you'll be greeted with a warm smile and provided the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina.

When you work with Hixon's Roofing, you're not working with a mediocre roofing company in Summers Corner. You're working with a team of experts who are fully insured, bonded, and licensed for your peace of mind. If you're looking for the best service and the best products in the roofing industry, look no further than Hixon's Roofing.

Service Areas

Unlike some of our competitors, we choose to put our customers first before everything else. When you choose to do business with Hixon's Roofing, you're also choosing:

  • A locally owned and operated roofing company in Summers Corner
  • A full-service roofing business that works on ALL types of roofs and provides emergency 24-hour service.
  • A trained, on-site foreman for roofing jobs that we complete.
  • A 10-year warranty on all architectural shingle work.
  • A 5-year warranty on three-tab roofs and metal roof repair in Summers Corner.
  • A roofing business that works with your home insurance provider from start to finish.
 Commercial Roofing Summers Corner, SC

There's a reason why Hixon's Roofing is considered the best roofing company in South Carolina. Instead of talking about why it would be our pleasure to show you in person. Whether your residential roof needs inspecting or your commercial structure needs a replacement, we're here to serve you.

The Top Residential Roofing Contractor in Summers Corner, SC

Hixon's has seen and done it all when it comes to residential roofing services in South Carolina. Whether you own a small, secluded ranch-style home or a sprawling mansion in the suburbs, we have the expertise and tools to accommodate any job. Do you need a small leak fixed on your asphalt roof? No problem, we've got you covered. Are you in need of a brand-new roof built from scratch? We can help you with that, too. At Hixon' Roofing, we pride ourselves on combining top-notch roofing services with family values. Trust, honesty, and hard work mean a lot to us. We treat your home and yard just like we would treat our own. If we create trash or debris in your yard, we clean it up. It all goes back to treating our customers how we would like to be treated - something that Hixon's has been doing since 1984.

 Local Roofing Contractors Summers Corner, SC

What types of residential roofing services do we offer in Summers Corner? Here are some of our most common job requests:

Roof-Repair
Roof Repair

Our team specializes in all forms of roof repair, from minor leaks to major structural issues.

New Roofs
New Roofs

We will build you a new roof from scratch, using high-quality materials. If you have a vision, we can make it a reality.

Re-Roofing
Re-Roofing

Depending on your needs, we can remove your old roof and install a new roof on your home.

Roofing Materials Replacement
Roofing Materials Replacement

We will replace your old, worn-out shingles, metals, and other roofing materials.

We provide quality craftsmanship and products because we believe in what we do. We want happy customers who refer their friends and family. You may not see flashy internet ads everywhere for our company, but that's by design. Our word-of-mouth referrals are so frequent and far-reaching that we don't need to pay for ad spots. We would rather invest that money into the best tools and most knowledgeable roofing experts available. That way, we can better serve our customers.

Because, at the end of the day, your satisfaction is our #1 priority.

Roof Repair in Summers Corner, SC

Your home's roof is exposed to the elements 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. As a homeowner, you probably do your best to keep your roof in good condition with regular maintenance and inspections. However, even properly maintained roofs can be damaged without notice. Mother Nature has her own set of rules, and when she chooses to unleash her power on your roof, there isn't too much you can do.

If your roof is leaking, growing moss, or your shingles are cracked, it's time to call the pros. You need contractors that are efficient, effective, and on-time. That's where Hixon's Roofing comes in.

Hixon's Roofing will provide quality roofing repairs for homes and businesses with all types of roofs. Whether you have a small, single-story home with a minor leak or a sprawling estate with multiple roofing issues, Hixon's will get your roof back to new in no time. It doesn't matter if we installed your roof or not, Hixon's will provide top-notch customer service and the highest quality roofing repairs in Summers Corner.

 Residential Roofing Company Summers Corner, SC

While some situations like downed trees require obvious roof repair, it's not always clear when your roof needs some TLC. Keep these common signs in mind the next time you do a visual inspection of your roof:

 Roofers Near Me Summers Corner, SC
Cracked or Missing Shingles:

If the shingles on your roof are cracked or curling, you can safely assume that they are nearing the end of their lifespan. If you notice shingles missing, it's an obvious sign that your roof needs some repair.

 Roofing And Siding Summers Corner, SC
Shingle Grit in Gutters:

Asphalt and composite shingles will shed granules over time, especially when they're starting to wear out. Often, these granules find their way into your gutter system. When you're cleaning your gutters this quarter, keep an eye out for this course, black grit. It's a telltale sign that your roof may need attention or repair.

 Home Roofing Contractors Summers Corner, SC
Sagging Roof Deck:

It's a good idea for every homeowner to check their attics for signs of leaks and general disrepair. While you're up there, look at the ceiling in your attic. If you notice the rafters or decking is sagging towards the ground, you could have a serious problem on your hands caused by a leak. If your roof deck is sagging, call Hixon's as soon as possible for an inspection. If the damage is localized, you can often avoid a full roof replacement.

 Roofing Companies Summers Corner, SC
Roof Flashing Deterioration:

The flashing around your chimney, skylight, and attic vents is a seal that keeps rain and other elements outside of your home. However, with time, flashing can crack or even break, which will lead to a leak in your home. This is most common in older homes that have flashing made of tar or cement. For many homeowners, the prospect of climbing up on a roof to check flashing isn't an option. In that case, you should call a team of professional roofers to inspect for you.

 Roofing Services Summers Corner, SC
Moss Growth:

Moss can add some charming character to your home, but in most cases, if you see moss growth, it means trouble. Moss (like fungi and mold) indicates that there could be moisture trapped in your roof's structure. When left untreated, this moisture can ruin your roof. You can get rid of the moss by using a stiff brush to wipe it away but be sure you address any underlying problems as well.

New Roof Installation inSummers Corner, SC

As a full-service roofing company, our team of expert roofers has installed hundreds of new roofs in South Carolina. Whether you need a metal roof for your secluded home in the woods or a new roof for your commercial business, we're here to make the installation process easy and streamlined.

It all starts when you call our office for a free estimate. We'll take all the time you need to go over your new roof installation options to customize the structure and style to your needs. Once we have defined the project's details, our roof installation professionals will get to work on your home or business. Unlike some roofing companies in Summers Corner, Hixon's is transparent about every step of the installation process. We keep our clients informed at all times and are happy to provide updates as we make progress on your new roof. While we are installing your new roof, we treat your home or business like our own. You can always count on friendly interactions and a clean and tidy work area. After your new roof is installed, we'll clean up behind ourselves so it's like we were never there.

When you hire Hixon's Roofing to install a roof on your home or business, know that we only use the highest-quality materials and the best construction techniques available. That way, you'll have a fantastic-looking roof that will last for decades. On top of our unmatched workmanship, clients also receive a 10-year labor warranty on architectural shingles and a 5-year labor warranty on three-tab and metal roofs.

Local Roofers Summers Corner, SC

Commercial Roofing Services inSummers Corner, SC

Residential and commercial roofing are similar in that they both require experienced contractors to perform quality work. However, unlike residential roofing (a more straightforward process), commercial roofing projects can be complicated and lengthy. In our experience, there can be dozens of factors to be considered to complete the job correctly. Commercial roofing contractors in Summers Corner, SC, must account for rooftop HVAC systems, external piping, external utilities, and more. Because commercial roofing structures typically have many layers, it's more difficult to find and remediate leaks. As such, our commercial roofing contractors have different skillsets than residential roofing pros.

Like the residential side of our business, we have completed hundreds of commercial roofing projects in South Carolina. We know exactly what it takes to repair, install, or inspect a commercial roof. When businesses in South Carolina need roofing work, they come to Hixon's Roofing because they know that we will get the job done right the first time. They know that our team is dependable, friendly, and highly qualified to accomplish any commercial roofing project. We're talking roof repairs for small offices to new roof installations on huge, multi-building industrial complexes.

If you're starting a commercial roofing project, don't settle for mediocre roofing contractors. After all, a commercial roofing project can be a huge investment, and you need to get your money's worth. Hixon's is here to exceed your expectations and take on any commercial roofing needs you may have, whether they're minor fixes or major roofing replacements.

 Commercial Roofing Summers Corner, SC

The Hixon's Advantage

At Hixon's Roofing, we make it difficult for any other roofing company to compete with our helpful and professional services. For more information about our company and what we can do for your home or business, contact our office in Summers Corner. Our customer service reps have the knowledge and information to answer your questions and get the ball rolling on your roofing project in South Carolina today.

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Latest News in Summers Corner, SC

Heat and humidity stressing high school athletes

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - School is back in full swing for most students and with it comes the return of fall sports. We’ve got football, tennis, cross-country, golf, band and cheerleading all underway. And these sports have one thing in common: they are outside.While fall is right around the corner, we all know that doesn’t mean the temperatures are going to be cooling off just yet. Which means our young athletes are dealing with the heat and humidity every time they head out for practices and games, matches and m...

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - School is back in full swing for most students and with it comes the return of fall sports. We’ve got football, tennis, cross-country, golf, band and cheerleading all underway. And these sports have one thing in common: they are outside.

While fall is right around the corner, we all know that doesn’t mean the temperatures are going to be cooling off just yet. Which means our young athletes are dealing with the heat and humidity every time they head out for practices and games, matches and meets.

When it’s hot and humid outside the risk for heat related illness goes up. Heat is the leading cause of death or disability among high school athletes according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. But it’s not just about how high the temperature is. Humidity plays a big role as well.

Dew points are a measure of the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. When dew points are above 60 degrees, which is very typical in late summer and early fall here, the body’s ability to cool itself by sweating is reduced. The sweat doesn’t evaporate off the skin, so it lingers make you feel warmer and more sticky, which in turn causes you to sweat more. This all leads to the body losing more fluid. The more dehydrated you become, the higher the risk for heat related illnesses such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

So it’s important for student athletes and coaches to know the sign of these illnesses, so they can keep themselves and their teammates safe as they hit the turf, the court or the trail.

There are some ways you can keep your student athletes safe this season.

Athletes should consume six to ten ounces of fluid for every 15 minutes of exercise. So coaches and supervisors should be encouraging frequent water breaks on hot days.

If practice is longer than an hour, add in sports drinks, as well as water, to help replace electrolytes.

Keep the drinks cold. When it’s hot outside, cold drinks are 50% more likely to be consumed than warm ones.

Remove unnecessary equipment when it’s extremely hot. Obviously, if it’s a safety concern, don’t lose the padding and helmets, but during non-contact drills on very hot days, less gear means the athletes are stay cooler.

And make sure the athletes are wearing light-colored, lightweight clothing that protects again the sun.

Copyright 2022 WHNS. All rights reserved.

Animal shelters fill with cats and dogs across South Carolina

Too many animals, not enough space — that's been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is "at the breaking point."Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for...

Too many animals, not enough space — that's been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is "at the breaking point."

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

Shelters all over are experiencing overwhelming numbers of animals making it difficult to keep up to give them homes.

In the Upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter's community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

"If we had the time, we could find placement for them," Church said. "But we don't have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues."

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

"We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year," Elmore said. "But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering."

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

"We get calls from time to time here with people saying, 'I've gotten deer in my yard, and I've never had deer in my yard.' It's because they're being flushed out from the development," Elmore said. "The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in."

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been "in crisis mode" all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

"Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago," Zuck said. "It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that's the number that we're anticipating taking this year, if not more."

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

"We're constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals," Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they're in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it's estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer's Corner.

"Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities," Zuck said. "We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that's coming in."

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

"A lot of people still don't know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don't know where we're located," Zuck said. "A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals."

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws' adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

"We have removed all barriers from the adoption process," Zuck said. "We want animals to be placed in loving homes."

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn't a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

"We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal," Elmore said.

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don't have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they've started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson's Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

"As much as I don't want a dog in a pop-up, it's still saving a life," Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

"We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters," Hoffman said. "With (the new building) comes the need for the community."

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

"We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters," Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they're taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

"We literally give everything needed," Hoffman said. "They just have to give the love."

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

"Our staff work here because they love animals," Hoffman said. "If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal."

Animal shelters fill with cats and dogs across S. Carolina

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

Shelters all over are experiencing overwhelming numbers of animals making it difficult to keep up to give them homes.

In the Upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter’s community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

“If we had the time, we could find placement for them,” Church said. “But we don’t have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues.”

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

“We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year,” Elmore said. “But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering.”

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

“We get calls from time to time here with people saying, ‘I’ve gotten deer in my yard, and I’ve never had deer in my yard.’ It’s because they’re being flushed out from the development,” Elmore said. “The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in.”

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been “in crisis mode” all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

“Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago,” Zuck said. “It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that’s the number that we’re anticipating taking this year, if not more.”

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

“We’re constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals,” Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they’re in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it’s estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer’s Corner.

“Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities,” Zuck said. “We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that’s coming in.”

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

“A lot of people still don’t know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don’t know where we’re located,” Zuck said. “A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals.”

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws’ adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

“We have removed all barriers from the adoption process,” Zuck said. “We want animals to be placed in loving homes.”

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn’t a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

“We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal,” Elmore said.

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don’t have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they’ve started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson’s Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

“As much as I don’t want a dog in a pop-up, it’s still saving a life,” Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

“We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters,” Hoffman said. “With (the new building) comes the need for the community.”

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

“We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they’re taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

“We literally give everything needed,” Hoffman said. “They just have to give the love.”

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

“Our staff work here because they love animals,” Hoffman said. “If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal.”

Tuley's Takes Today 9/12: Monday Best Bets, NFL Week 2 leans, Contest Corner

Sunday was Christmas morning in the Tuley’s Takes home office as we had the opening Sunday of NFL action. It was worth the wait, at least from an entertainment standpoint and your overall experience probably depended on how your bets and contest plays went (47 percent of Circa Survivor entrants are one and done).The big news was the upsets even though favorites and underdogs actually split 7-7 ATS on the day (see all my betting stats in the recap section below). Look at this list of the teams that lost (or tied as you must win) ...

Sunday was Christmas morning in the Tuley’s Takes home office as we had the opening Sunday of NFL action. It was worth the wait, at least from an entertainment standpoint and your overall experience probably depended on how your bets and contest plays went (47 percent of Circa Survivor entrants are one and done).

The big news was the upsets even though favorites and underdogs actually split 7-7 ATS on the day (see all my betting stats in the recap section below). Look at this list of the teams that lost (or tied as you must win) on Sunday and the number of players who used them out of the 6,133 entrants in Circa Survivor:

Colts 875

Titans 708

49ers 703

Bengals 460

That took care of 40 percent of the field, and when the dust had finally settled on Sunday night, 47 percent of the field was gone as only 3,254 remain alive with 569 still needing the Broncos on Monday Night Football (1 on Seahawks).

Personally, it was a bit of a disappointing day for yours truly, Dave Tuley, as we went 1-2 ATS with our Best Bets posted here in my columns last week (win on Steelers but losses on Raiders and Cardinals, plus losing our teasers on Ravens/Colts and Vikings/Cowboys) and going 2-3 ATS with our contest entries in Circa Sports Million and Westgate SuperContest. It was frustrating as there were plenty of dogs to find but we were just on the wrong ones.

Let’s recap the rest of the Sunday action and try to close the weekend with Best Bets on Monday.

Sunday’s recaps

NFL: Buccaneers beat Cowboys 19-3 on SNF to wrap up opening Sunday. They also covered after closing as 2.5-point road favorites (game stayed way Under the closing betting total of 49.5 points; bettors were on the right side as it opened 52 at several books). Faves went 9-4-1 SU on Sunday and tied dogs at 7-7 ATS (10-4-1 SU and 8-7 ATS overall in Week 1, including Thursday Night Football). Road teams went 8-5-1 SU Sunday but home teams led 8-6 ATS (road 9-5-1 SU, home 8-7 ATS including TNF). Unders 9-5 (10-5 including TNF).

More NFL: Faves 5-3-1 SU (Colts-Texans ended in 20-20 tie with Texans covering + 7), but dogs led 6-3 ATS. The psets were by the Steelers (+ 7 in OT at Bengals), Bears (+ 6.5 vs. 49ers) and Browns (+ 1.5 at Panthers). The Lions (+ 6) covered in loss vs. Eagles. Road teams 5-3-1 SU but home teams 6-3 ATS (home dogs 4-1 ATS). Unders 5-4. In the “afternoon” session (4:25 p.m. ET/1:25 p.m. PT kickoffs), faves went 3-1 SU and ATS with only upset by Giants + 5.5 in 21-20 win at TEN on late 2-point conversion (note: Vikings closed -2 in 23-7 win vs. Packers after being a dog all summer). Chiefs -6.5 and Chargers -3.5 both covered. Home/road teams split 2-2 SU and ATS. Unders went 3-1.

MLB: Faves went 10-5 Sunday with upsets by the A's (+ 150 in 10-3 rout vs. White Sox), Mariners (+ 112 in wild 8-7 win vs. Braves), Rangers (+ 105 in 4-1 win at Blue Jays), Red Sox (+ 105 in 1-0 win at Orioles) and Giants (-102 in 4-2 win at Cubs). Home teams 8-7. Overs 9-6.

More MLB: Faves lead 1,245-811 SU (60.6 percent) on the season with 32 pick-'ems (faves usually win around 59 percent; still ahead of pace; gap had been narrowing but now back well over 60 percent). Home teams lead 1,106-990 (52.8 percent, usually closer to 54 percent but on the rise). Unders lead 1,024-962-108 (51.5 percent).

Contest Corner

Circa Sports Million (4,691 entrants at $1,000 apiece) Top 5 Most-Selected Teams are 3-1 in Week 1 with Broncos -6.5 at Seahawks pending Monday Night Football. Wins were by No. 1 choice Vikings + 1.5 vs. Packers, Ravens -7 at Jets and Steelers + 6.5 at Bengals while the lone loss so far was by the Eagles -4 at Lions.

SuperContest (1,598 entrants at $1,000 apiece) Top 5 Most-Selected Teams went 3-2 in Week 1 with wins on Vikings + 1.5, Ravens -7 and Steelers + 6.5. Losses were by the Eagles-4 and Panthers -1.5; SuperContestGold (80 entrants in the $5,000 winner-take-all version of the SC) went 4-2 with Browns and Patriots tying for No. 5 spot.

Monday’s Takes

Broncos -1/Over 38 (2-team, 6-point teaser): This wasn’t a Best Bet in my columns last week, but I gave it out on the “Greg Peterson Experience” show on VSiN last night (shameless plug: check me out at 12:15 a.m. ET Monday/9:15 p.m. PT after the games are done to hear the above betting recap numbers as well as my takes on the day’s action and looks ahead to the MNF game and next week’s openers). Russell Wilson makes his Denver debut against his former team and we just need the Broncos to basically win the game (bettor beware: this didn’t work out so well with the Colts teased down to -1 on Sunday!). As I told Peterson, we saw Unders get off to a strong start, but we believe the crackdown on defensive holding will still lead to more Overs moving forward and this total is low enough that these two teams can get Over just 38 points. I’m looking at something like a 23-17 or 27-13 score, so it’s not like we even need a shootout.

Rangers 1st 5 + 110 at Marlins: We’ve had some success with the Rangers and Glenn Otto (5-8, 4.80 ERA, 1.38 WHIP and Rangers are 2-1 in his last 5 starts). Those aren’t great numbers, but they’re still better than Miami’s Trevor Rogers, plus we know how hard it is for the Marlins to score many runs.

Early NFL Week 2 leans (also given out on “Greg Peterson Experience”):

VIkings + 3 at Eagles on Monday Night Football

Seahawks + 8.5 at 49ers (fading Trey Lance; line to be affected by MNF)

Saints TBD vs. Buccaneers (Saints’ D has Tom Brady’s number…off the board with Bucs playing Sunday night)

No. 9 Akron Hosts Buckeyes Tuesday

Ohio State at No. 9 Akron Date: Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022 Times: 7 p.m. ET Venue: Akron, Ohio — First Energy Stadium (5,000) Watch: ESPN+ Live Stats: OhioStateBuckeyes.com ...

Ohio State at No. 9 Akron Date: Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022 Times: 7 p.m. ET Venue: Akron, Ohio — First Energy Stadium (5,000) Watch: ESPN+ Live Stats: OhioStateBuckeyes.com Game Notes: Ohio State | Akron Rosters: Ohio State PDF | Akron Season Stats: Ohio State | Akron

COLUMBUS, Ohio – No. 9 Akron (4-1-0) plays host to the undefeated Buckeyes (4-0-1) Tuesday at First Energy Stadium with first touch scheduled for 7 p.m. ESPN+ will live stream the action.

The game is the second in as many outings for the Buckeyes against Top 12 opponents. Ohio State knocked off the No. 12 Butler Bulldogs in Columbus last Friday, 2-0.

Ohio State has not allowed a goal in the last 399 minutes of game action. Senior keeper Keagan McLaughlin was named the Big Ten’s Defensive Player of the Week after posting back-to-back shutouts over intrastate foes Bowling Green (1-0) on the road and Wright State (2-0) last week. He followed that effort with the win over No. 12 Butler, the fourth-consecutive shutout of the year for the Buckeyes.

The transfer from Notre Dame, now in his second season at Ohio State, along with the Buckeye defense, has allowed just one goal on the year.

The BASICS

Check out the recap of the 2-0 win over Butler

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Three Named to B1G Watch List Senior Xavier Green along with juniors Laurence Wootton and Deylen Vellios were selected by the league coaches for the annual watch list, which consists of 27 players, three each from the nine league teams. Wootton, Ohio State’s MVP in 2021 and a two-time first-team All-Big Ten selection, led Ohio State with six goals and 14 points as a sophomore. Green, who elected to return for a fifth season in 2022, was next with four goals and nine points a season ago. Vellios played in all 16 games on defense and helped the Buckeyes hold nine opponents to a goal or less in 2021.

New Season, New Numbers Several Buckeyes will be wearing new numbers for the 2022 season. They are: # — Name, Pos. (previous #) 1 — Keagan McLaughlin, GK (24) 4 — Owen Sullivan, D (20) 6 — Thomas Gilej, D (2) 7 — Joakim Jahnsen, M (14) 8 — Laurence Wootton, M (17)

The Basics Most 2022 fall matches are available on B1G+ ($) unless otherwise noted. Fans can follow the Buckeyes with updates on twitter via @OhioStateMSOC. Links, including notes, live stats and more can be found on the OSU men’s soccer schedule page.

Home Cooking Ohio State holds a 127-67-33 record in Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium since the facility opened in 1999. All-time, Ohio State is 279-195-66 at home.

The 2022 Rookies Eight true freshmen and one transfer arrived over the summer to join Brian Maisonneuve’s fifth edition of Ohio State men’s soccer for the 2022 season. The class includes a pair of defenders, four midfielders, two forwards and one goalkeeper. Reed Davis transferred to play in Columbus from Jacksonville. To date, Luciano Pechota, Ashton Bilow, Marko Borkovic, Donny Williams and Tanner Creech have seen action during the regular season. 2022 Ohio State Newcomers 2-Dyland Onwona-Agyeman, Fr., D 13-Reed Davis, R-Sr., TR, F 14-Luciano Pechota, Fr. M 15-Ashton Bilow, Fr., M 17-Marko Borkovic, Fr., M 20-Jacob Maisonneuve, Fr, M 23-Donny Williams, Fr., D 24-RJ Stoller, Fr., GK 30-Tanner Creech, Fr., F

Maisonneuve at OSU Head coach Brian Maisonneuve is in his fifth year as head coach of the Buckeyes. Maisonneuve came from Indiana University where he was associate head coach for the Hoosiers. As one of the top assistants in the country, Maisonneuve guided Indiana to the 2012 NCAA National Title, a NCAA runner-up finish in 2017, the 2010 Big Ten Regular-Season Title as well as the 2013 Big Ten Tournament Championship. Maisonneuve, a native of Warren, Mich., was one of the top players in Indiana soccer history, winning the Hermann Trophy in 1994. He spent nine seasons with the Columbus Crew from 1996-2004 and was a member of the United States’ 1998 World Cup team. Maisonneuve is assisted by Matt Foldesy and Travis Morris along with director of operations Corey Brueggeman.

Game One: Ohio State 1, South Carolina 1 The Buckeyes scored first on a Chris Dowling goal in the 16′ but the Gamecocks got the equalizer in the 51′ and the score held in the first game of the 2022 Wolstein Classic for both teams. Ohio State keeper Keagan McLaughlin stopped two of three USC shots on the night.

Game Two: Ohio State 3, Cal Poly 0 Ohio State freshmen proved to be the difference in the shutout of the Mustangs in the final game of the 2022 Wolstein Classic. Marko Borkovic and Ashton Bilow each recorded their first Ohio State goals while classmate Luciano Pechota added a pair of assists. Junior Laurence Wootton tallied his first goal of the year while adding assist in the win. Keagan McLaughlin made four saves while Ohio State’s defense allowed Cal Poly just seven total shots.

Game Three: Ohio State 1, Bowling Green 0 After stopping an early Bowling Green penalty kick, Keagan McLaughlin completed the shutout, his second of the year, in a 1-0 win over the Falcons. Laurence Wootton, fresh from earning Big Ten Offensive Player of the Week accolades, provided the game-winner on a successful penalty kick in the 79th minute to help the Buckeyes improve to 2-0-1 on the year.

Game Four: Ohio State 2, Wright State 0 Junior Parker Grinstead broke a 24-game scoreless streak with a first-half goal to give Ohio State the lead before freshman Marko Borkovic scored for the second time as a Buckeye in the second half to give Ohio State a 2-0 win over the visiting Raiders. Keagan McLaughlin extended his streak of not allowing a goal to 310 minutes over the first four games of the season, including shutouts in the last three outings.

Game Five: Ohio State 2, Butler 0 Ohio State’s defense extended its streak of not allowing a goal in front of keeper Keagan McLaughlin to 399 minutes with a 2-0 win over No. 12 Butler. Freshman Marko Borkovic got the Buckeyes on the board first in the 48th minute with after a Butler turnover in front of its net. Senior Devyn Etling put the game away with a header off a corner kick from Anthony Samways in the 70th.

#GoBucks

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