Roofing Contractor inGreensboro, NC.

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Local Roofers Greensboro, NC

When it comes to protection, few features are as important as the roof above your head. Your roof is much more than just a hat for your house - it keeps outside elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind outside so you and your family can stay comfortable and dry inside. A properly maintained roof also helps protect your home's structural integrity, keeps critters out, and insulates your home during cold months. With all that said, it's easy to see why your roof plays such a crucial role in your everyday life. That's why, when your roof needs maintenance or replacement, you need to work with experienced, trustworthy roofers in Greensboro, NC.

Hixon's Roofing has been Greensboro's go-to contractor for new roof installations and repairs for nearly three decades. As locals in the Greensboro community, we pride ourselves on honesty, hard work, and being a business that you can count on consistently. There's no secret as to why our company is successful. The bottom line is that we do right by our customers and treat them the way we would like our own family to be treated. That's why, when you hire Hixon's Roofing, you'll be greeted with a warm smile and provided the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina.

When you work with Hixon's Roofing, you're not working with a mediocre roofing company in Greensboro. You're working with a team of experts who are fully insured, bonded, and licensed for your peace of mind. If you're looking for the best service and the best products in the roofing industry, look no further than Hixon's Roofing.

Service Areas

Unlike some of our competitors, we choose to put our customers first before everything else. When you choose to do business with Hixon's Roofing, you're also choosing:

  • A locally owned and operated roofing company in Greensboro
  • A full-service roofing business that works on ALL types of roofs and provides emergency 24-hour service.
  • A trained, on-site foreman for roofing jobs that we complete.
  • A 10-year warranty on all architectural shingle work.
  • A 5-year warranty on three-tab roofs and metal roof repair in Greensboro.
  • A roofing business that works with your home insurance provider from start to finish.
 Commercial Roofing Greensboro, NC

There's a reason why Hixon's Roofing is considered the best roofing company in South Carolina. Instead of talking about why it would be our pleasure to show you in person. Whether your residential roof needs inspecting or your commercial structure needs a replacement, we're here to serve you.

The Top Residential Roofing Contractor in Greensboro, NC

Hixon's has seen and done it all when it comes to residential roofing services in South Carolina. Whether you own a small, secluded ranch-style home or a sprawling mansion in the suburbs, we have the expertise and tools to accommodate any job. Do you need a small leak fixed on your asphalt roof? No problem, we've got you covered. Are you in need of a brand-new roof built from scratch? We can help you with that, too. At Hixon' Roofing, we pride ourselves on combining top-notch roofing services with family values. Trust, honesty, and hard work mean a lot to us. We treat your home and yard just like we would treat our own. If we create trash or debris in your yard, we clean it up. It all goes back to treating our customers how we would like to be treated - something that Hixon's has been doing since 1984.

 Local Roofing Contractors Greensboro, NC

What types of residential roofing services do we offer in Greensboro? Here are some of our most common job requests:

Roof-Repair
Roof Repair

Our team specializes in all forms of roof repair, from minor leaks to major structural issues.

New Roofs
New Roofs

We will build you a new roof from scratch, using high-quality materials. If you have a vision, we can make it a reality.

Re-Roofing
Re-Roofing

Depending on your needs, we can remove your old roof and install a new roof on your home.

Roofing Materials Replacement
Roofing Materials Replacement

We will replace your old, worn-out shingles, metals, and other roofing materials.

We provide quality craftsmanship and products because we believe in what we do. We want happy customers who refer their friends and family. You may not see flashy internet ads everywhere for our company, but that's by design. Our word-of-mouth referrals are so frequent and far-reaching that we don't need to pay for ad spots. We would rather invest that money into the best tools and most knowledgeable roofing experts available. That way, we can better serve our customers.

Because, at the end of the day, your satisfaction is our #1 priority.

Roof Repair in Greensboro, NC

Your home's roof is exposed to the elements 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. As a homeowner, you probably do your best to keep your roof in good condition with regular maintenance and inspections. However, even properly maintained roofs can be damaged without notice. Mother Nature has her own set of rules, and when she chooses to unleash her power on your roof, there isn't too much you can do.

If your roof is leaking, growing moss, or your shingles are cracked, it's time to call the pros. You need contractors that are efficient, effective, and on-time. That's where Hixon's Roofing comes in.

Hixon's Roofing will provide quality roofing repairs for homes and businesses with all types of roofs. Whether you have a small, single-story home with a minor leak or a sprawling estate with multiple roofing issues, Hixon's will get your roof back to new in no time. It doesn't matter if we installed your roof or not, Hixon's will provide top-notch customer service and the highest quality roofing repairs in Greensboro.

 Residential Roofing Company Greensboro, NC

While some situations like downed trees require obvious roof repair, it's not always clear when your roof needs some TLC. Keep these common signs in mind the next time you do a visual inspection of your roof:

 Roofers Near Me Greensboro, NC
Cracked or Missing Shingles:

If the shingles on your roof are cracked or curling, you can safely assume that they are nearing the end of their lifespan. If you notice shingles missing, it's an obvious sign that your roof needs some repair.

 Roofing And Siding Greensboro, NC
Shingle Grit in Gutters:

Asphalt and composite shingles will shed granules over time, especially when they're starting to wear out. Often, these granules find their way into your gutter system. When you're cleaning your gutters this quarter, keep an eye out for this course, black grit. It's a telltale sign that your roof may need attention or repair.

 Home Roofing Contractors Greensboro, NC
Sagging Roof Deck:

It's a good idea for every homeowner to check their attics for signs of leaks and general disrepair. While you're up there, look at the ceiling in your attic. If you notice the rafters or decking is sagging towards the ground, you could have a serious problem on your hands caused by a leak. If your roof deck is sagging, call Hixon's as soon as possible for an inspection. If the damage is localized, you can often avoid a full roof replacement.

 Roofing Companies Greensboro, NC
Roof Flashing Deterioration:

The flashing around your chimney, skylight, and attic vents is a seal that keeps rain and other elements outside of your home. However, with time, flashing can crack or even break, which will lead to a leak in your home. This is most common in older homes that have flashing made of tar or cement. For many homeowners, the prospect of climbing up on a roof to check flashing isn't an option. In that case, you should call a team of professional roofers to inspect for you.

 Roofing Services Greensboro, NC
Moss Growth:

Moss can add some charming character to your home, but in most cases, if you see moss growth, it means trouble. Moss (like fungi and mold) indicates that there could be moisture trapped in your roof's structure. When left untreated, this moisture can ruin your roof. You can get rid of the moss by using a stiff brush to wipe it away but be sure you address any underlying problems as well.

New Roof Installation inGreensboro, NC

As a full-service roofing company, our team of expert roofers has installed hundreds of new roofs in South Carolina. Whether you need a metal roof for your secluded home in the woods or a new roof for your commercial business, we're here to make the installation process easy and streamlined.

It all starts when you call our office for a free estimate. We'll take all the time you need to go over your new roof installation options to customize the structure and style to your needs. Once we have defined the project's details, our roof installation professionals will get to work on your home or business. Unlike some roofing companies in Greensboro, Hixon's is transparent about every step of the installation process. We keep our clients informed at all times and are happy to provide updates as we make progress on your new roof. While we are installing your new roof, we treat your home or business like our own. You can always count on friendly interactions and a clean and tidy work area. After your new roof is installed, we'll clean up behind ourselves so it's like we were never there.

When you hire Hixon's Roofing to install a roof on your home or business, know that we only use the highest-quality materials and the best construction techniques available. That way, you'll have a fantastic-looking roof that will last for decades. On top of our unmatched workmanship, clients also receive a 10-year labor warranty on architectural shingles and a 5-year labor warranty on three-tab and metal roofs.

Local Roofers Greensboro, NC

Commercial Roofing Services inGreensboro, NC

Residential and commercial roofing are similar in that they both require experienced contractors to perform quality work. However, unlike residential roofing (a more straightforward process), commercial roofing projects can be complicated and lengthy. In our experience, there can be dozens of factors to be considered to complete the job correctly. Commercial roofing contractors in Greensboro, NC, must account for rooftop HVAC systems, external piping, external utilities, and more. Because commercial roofing structures typically have many layers, it's more difficult to find and remediate leaks. As such, our commercial roofing contractors have different skillsets than residential roofing pros.

Like the residential side of our business, we have completed hundreds of commercial roofing projects in South Carolina. We know exactly what it takes to repair, install, or inspect a commercial roof. When businesses in South Carolina need roofing work, they come to Hixon's Roofing because they know that we will get the job done right the first time. They know that our team is dependable, friendly, and highly qualified to accomplish any commercial roofing project. We're talking roof repairs for small offices to new roof installations on huge, multi-building industrial complexes.

If you're starting a commercial roofing project, don't settle for mediocre roofing contractors. After all, a commercial roofing project can be a huge investment, and you need to get your money's worth. Hixon's is here to exceed your expectations and take on any commercial roofing needs you may have, whether they're minor fixes or major roofing replacements.

 Commercial Roofing Greensboro, NC

The Hixon's Advantage

At Hixon's Roofing, we make it difficult for any other roofing company to compete with our helpful and professional services. For more information about our company and what we can do for your home or business, contact our office in Greensboro. Our customer service reps have the knowledge and information to answer your questions and get the ball rolling on your roofing project in South Carolina today.

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Latest News in Greensboro, NC

NC university pitches high school video game league as esports offerings grow in the state

Officials at UNC-Greensboro want to build a new, statewide, high school video gaming league to capitalize on “esports,” the large and growing world of competitive gaming.The university, which already has a competitive gaming hub in North Carolina, hopes to start a pilot program in the Triad. It wants the league to help interest young people in computers and technology more broadly, increasing the number of students with cutting edge training.“We believe esports is the shiny object that gets students interested...

Officials at UNC-Greensboro want to build a new, statewide, high school video gaming league to capitalize on “esports,” the large and growing world of competitive gaming.

The university, which already has a competitive gaming hub in North Carolina, hopes to start a pilot program in the Triad. It wants the league to help interest young people in computers and technology more broadly, increasing the number of students with cutting edge training.

“We believe esports is the shiny object that gets students interested in the curriculum,” Todd Sutton, UNCG’s associate vice chancellor for learning technology and client services, said Thursday during a presentation to state lawmakers who gathered in Raleigh for a committee meeting on a range of technology issues.

The university doesn’t have a timeline in place or specific high schools lined up, Sutton said. But he said it could be the nation’s first “curriculum driven” esports league. He said the university hopes to build a statewide league with fall and spring seasons, including playoffs and championship matches held at the university, which opened an esports arena and learning lab in April.

“Students were lined up around the building” when it opened, Sutton said, reinforcing the popularity of a billion-dollar global industry involving young people who watch online as video gamers compete. Sutton said more than 465 million people watched live-streamed gaming in 2021, and that number is expected to grow.

“We’re talking numbers bigger than pro sports,” he said. “This is a significant industry that is surrounding kids playing video games.”

The university already offers a non-credit certificate in esports focused on tournament design, sponsorship and fan engagement, according to Sutton’s presentation to lawmakers. It offers classes on the hospitality and tourism angles to esports, and it plans to offer an esports minor.

https://webservices.ncleg.gov/ViewDocSiteFile/71570

UNCG ran week-long esports summer camps this year for 9 to 14 year olds, which had long waiting lists, Sutton said.

“It was shocking how quickly they sold out,” he said.

The university has partnered with Epic Games, the Cary-based video game goliath, to train students on the company’s Unreal Engine, which is used in 3-D rendering. The company plans to train UNCG faculty in October. Once certified, the university will be one of three Unreal Engine accelerator programs in North America, Sutton said.

“We’re extremely excited about this,” Sutton said. “There is a need to be able to train-up our students.”

Lawmakers who heard the presentation Thursday were enthusiastic, and a key state budget writer—who has been a proponent of the esports movement—indicated there will be room in future state budgets to bolster esports programs.

“Look forward to future updates and future asks,” House Appropriations Committee Chairman

Jason Saine

, R-Lincoln, told Sutton.

Last year’s budget included $5 million to attract video gaming competitions to the state.

McFeely: Five things to watch in the Bison-North Carolina A&T game

FARGO — Yes, North Dakota State has a game Saturday against North Carolina A&T. No, college football teams cannot afford to overlook any opponent. Yes, the Aggies will be a better team than Drake, the foe the Bison dispatched 56-14 in the season opener last week.But if you squint hard enough, you can see cactus on the horizon.Those would be in the Sonoran desert of Arizona, where next week NDSU will play its first game against a Football Bowl Subdivision opponent in six years. The University of Arizona is in Tucson an...

FARGO — Yes, North Dakota State has a game Saturday against North Carolina A&T. No, college football teams cannot afford to overlook any opponent. Yes, the Aggies will be a better team than Drake, the foe the Bison dispatched 56-14 in the season opener last week.

But if you squint hard enough, you can see cactus on the horizon.

Those would be in the Sonoran desert of Arizona, where next week NDSU will play its first game against a Football Bowl Subdivision opponent in six years. The University of Arizona is in Tucson and it is the most-anticipated Bison non-conference game in, well, six years.

The apparently much-improved Wildcats, 1-10 last year, walloped San Diego State 38-20 in their season opener. They take on Mississippi State of the mighty Southeastern Conference this Saturday in a 10 p.m. Central kickoff. Many eyes in Fargo and North Dakota will be on that game.

NDSU is favored by 33 1/2 points over A&T, a proud program with a winning tradition. So the Bison would like to be sharper than they were last week against overmatched Drake. A faster start would help.

But if the Bison do what they are expected to do against the Aggies, it is time for Arizona Week to begin. Finally.

Here are five things to watch in the Bison-North Carolina A&T game.

Drake, one of the poorest offensive teams in FCS a season ago, opened last week's game with a nine-play, 75-yard touchdown drive that took nearly 5 minutes. The Bulldogs completed a 17-yard pass, a 31-yard pass and had runs of 10 and 9 yards on the drive.

It was only one drive, and Drake wasn't going to win the game, but it was a weak start for a Bison defense again expected to be outstanding. Instead of coming out on fire in the first game of the season and smothering the Bulldogs, the Bison looked flat.

Bison head coach Matt Entz took responsibility.

"I'll take a little bit of the blame. We probably anticipated that maybe we could get ourselves fired up. I'm probably going to have to do a better job pregame of maybe lighting the fire, regardless of who we play," Entz said in his postgame remarks, adding that perhaps the Bison overprepared and had "paralysis by analysis."

It's understandable, given NDSU knew it was going to have little trouble against the non-scholarship Bulldogs. It happens. It's a long season. The players who watch film are human.

Regardless, expect the Bison to have a faster start against the Aggies as NDSU ramps up in preparation for Arizona and the coming Missouri Valley Football Conference season.

If that doesn't happen, then it's something to revisit.

I wrote about North Carolina A&T and head coach Sam Washington this week, focusing on the Aggies' proud history as an HBCU (historically Black college or university) and Washington's lifelong devotion to those schools.

HBCUs in large part have tremendous followings and a few of the schools, including well-known Jackson State, are among the top-drawing FCS programs. A&T ranked 12th last year in attendance with an average of more than 12,000 fans per game.

One side note: It's too bad the A&T marching band, the Blue and Gold Marching Machine, couldn't make the trip to Fargo. One of the great college marching bands.

Anyway ... NDSU has a long history of playing HBCUs. Washington, in fact, was the defensive coordinator for the Mississippi Valley State team that came to the Fargodome in 2006 (a 45-0 Bison win). NDSU has played the Delta Devils three times.

Going back to the Bison's Division II days, they played Central State of Ohio twice in the 1980s in the playoffs and squared off against Virginia Union in the 1982 playoffs.

NDSU hosted Prairie View A&M in 2012 in a non-conference game and followed that with a game against Delaware State in 2013, the game following Fargo's first hosting of ESPN's "College GameDay" program.

But the biggest game against an HBCU came in the 1965 Pecan Bowl, when NDSU secured its first national championship (in what was then called the College Division) by defeating famed Grambling State and head coach Eddie Robinson 20-7 in Abilene, Texas.

Wrote Fargo Forum sports editor Eugene "Fitz" Fitzgerald in the next morning's newspaper:

"ABILENE, Tex. — The North Dakota State University Bison removed any vestige of doubt about their right to a claim on the 1965 national small college football championship here Saturday.

"They did it with convincing 20-7 victory over the Grambling College Tigers of Grambling, La., in the second annual Pecan Bowl game before 8,500 paid fans.

"The Bison, rated No. 1 in the Associated Press and the United Press International weekly polls, supposedly had taken on too much in Grambling's big and speedy individualists, three of them high on the draft lists of professional football teams.

"The North Dakota opportunists lost no time in convincing their highly rated opponents, victors in 9 of 11 bowl games, that they had come to play."

That history continues against A&T.

NDSU entered the season with the usual high expectations, but with two obvious questions. Who would become the No. 1 receiver with Christian Watson moving on to the NFL? And which players would make up the linebacker corps, particularly at middle linebacker?

It's not clear anything was cemented after Week 1.

The Bison threw just 13 passes in the blowout over Drake and only two wide receivers made catches — senior Zach Mathis had a 31-yard touchdown reception and senior Phoenix Sproles made a 15-yard catch.

Mathis' touchdown came on a wide receiver screen, so was it was a catch-and-run instead of a run-and-catch.

The Bison offense will continue to look for clarity in that situation.

Against Drake, NDSU split snaps pretty evenly among the players listed on the two-deep depth chart at each linebacker position, according to Pro Football Focus.

Nick Kubitz played 32 snaps at middle linebacker, compared to 30 for Luke Weerts.

James Kaczor played 32 snaps at weakside linebacker, compared to 29 for Logan Kopp.

Oscar Benson played 29 snaps at strongside linebacker, compared to 24 for Julian Wlodarczyk.

Entz indicated at his Monday press conference the Bison would likely rotate linebackers against A&T, too.

Kaczor, Benson and Kubitz received the highest grades from PFF, according to the analytics firm. Kopp and Wlodarczyk received lower grades.

With speedy Arizona and its mobile quarterback Jayden De Laura up next, this will be an area to watch.

Jayden Price is becoming a must-see on special teams with his punt return ability.

The cornerback returned his third punt for a touchdown against Drake, taking a second-quarter boot and running 67 yards untouched to the end zone. Bulldogs coach Todd Sepsis said after the game his punter made a mistake kicking the ball down the middle of the field because it gave Price the entire width of the field to navigate.

"I put a lot of trust in my teammates," Price said postgame. "I grab that thing and run for my life."

He also ran one back 85 yards against Illinois State in the spring 2021 season and returned one 45 yards last year against Valparaiso, like Drake, a Pioneer Football League program.

There were several occasions over the past two seasons when Price nearly broke punt returns for touchdowns.

Price is the active FCS leader with a career punt return average of 15.85, which ranks second in school history behind Travis White’s 16.0 average from 2002 to 2006.

Don't take your eyes off the field when No. 23 jogs back to receive a punt.

Straight from the pregame notes:

"After going over 100 career total offense attempts last week against Drake, Jalen Bussey currently ranks first in NDSU history averaging 8.75 yards per play. Bussey had touchdown runs last year of 61 yards against Youngstown State and a career-long 72 yards against Valparaiso. He also has a 50-yard kickoff return to his credit."

The little running back from Tampa (5-foot-5, 160 pounds) is a big-play guy even with the limited carries he receives.

Against Drake, Bussey had just three carries for 10 yards. He's coming off a foot injury suffered during last year's playoffs in December, so it was a positive to see him practice all fall camp and get carries in the first game.

This week, there might be an opportunity for Bussey to bust a big play. NDSU's offensive line will likely control the line of scrimmage against the smallish Aggies, who allowed North Carolina Central to convert on 10 of 16 (63%) of its third downs last week.

If Bussey gets a handful of opportunities in the Bison's backfield rotation, this might set up as a game in which he breaks a long touchdown run. Eight different running backs, and 11 players overall, had carries against Drake.

(Forum reporter Eric Peterson contributed to this story.)

McFeely: His 'calling' is Black colleges and North Carolina A&T coach has spent a career answering it

FARGO — North Carolina A&T lost to archrival North Carolina Central last weekend in a game dubbed the Duke's Mayo Classic played at the Carolina Panthers' stadium in Charlotte. Announced attendance was 35,798. It was the 100th anniversary of the first meeting between the Aggies and the Eagles, and so a particularly bitter defeat for A&T.The disappointment did not stop A&T head coach Sam Washington from saying this to the media after the game: "This was everything for HBCUs."A quick history lesson, as...

FARGO — North Carolina A&T lost to archrival North Carolina Central last weekend in a game dubbed the Duke's Mayo Classic played at the Carolina Panthers' stadium in Charlotte. Announced attendance was 35,798. It was the 100th anniversary of the first meeting between the Aggies and the Eagles, and so a particularly bitter defeat for A&T.

The disappointment did not stop A&T head coach Sam Washington from saying this to the media after the game: "This was everything for HBCUs."

A quick history lesson, as North Carolina A&T makes its first visit to the Fargodome on Saturday to face North Dakota State.

HBCU stands for "historically Black colleges and universities," a designation given to schools created after the Civil War — mostly in the South — to provide African-Americans with an education during a time when they were barred or discouraged from attending school.

The University of North Carolina, as an example, wasn't forced to desegregate until 1951.

A&T (located in Greensboro) and Central (Durham) are two of 107 HBCUs still in existence. HBCUs are open to all, but A&T's student body of 13,300 is made up of almost 12,000 minority students.

When I read a Charlotte newspaper story in which Washington was quoted as saying last week's game was "everything," it piqued my curiosity. So I set up an interview with the coach to ask why.

"Because I'm a product of HBCU football and I've seen it from the ground up," said the 62-year-old in his fifth year as head coach at A&T. "I saw it when we played at schools that didn't even have bleachers. To go from that to playing in an NFL stadium in front of 36,000 fans, that's remarkable. To see Duke's invest in and sponsor an HBCU game like that, I think that's huge. Just a few years ago, that was unheard of. It wouldn't have happened. It was a special day."

Indeed, the game was billed as a celebration of African-American culture. The Charlotte newspaper reported thousands of fans from both schools packing the streets and restaurants around the stadium. The outstanding bands from both schools played at halftime and "fans largely stayed in their seats" to watch the performance.

It was a day to remember, despite the outcome for A&T.

And for a man like Washington, as he said, special.

He is a football man who made a decision early in life that HBCUs were his devotion.

Offered scholarships by 36 schools during his high school playing days in Tampa, Fla., he chose HBCU Mississippi Valley State. After a four-year playing career in the NFL from 1982-85 as a cornerback, he embarked on a college coaching path that's stopped at six schools. All were HBCUs — Bethune-Cookman, Johnson C. Smith, North Carolina Central, Mississippi Valley State, Grambling State and North Carolina A&T (two stints).

Was that purposeful?

"Yes it was. I would say it happened by design," Washington said. "It's my calling."

Why?

"To help give young Black men the opportunities I was given. There are many Black men like myself who grew up in poverty and who don't have many opportunities. I was given the opportunity to earn a college degree and the opportunity to play football, a sport I absolutely love," Washington said. "It was an opportunity given to me and I want to give that back to my community."

Washington's parents moved to Tampa in the 1950s from Alabama "with nothing but what they had in their hands," he said. His dad went to work for a family construction company, as did Washington "at a very young age, to help ends meet."

"For me, football kept me off the streets. In my neighborhood, there were a lot of kids in the drug scene and a lot who were gun carriers. Many didn't make it," Washington said.

His first exposure to HBCUs came via television. The games of Louisiana's famed Grambling State and legendary coach Eddie Robinson were carried on Tampa TV.

"As a little kid in the 1960s, I would run home from playing youth football — and I mean run — to watch those games," Washington said. "That has a lot to do with where my heart is. To see those games on an old black-and-white TV on Channel 16 in Tampa. It gave me hope I could get out of my situation and play the sport that I love."

You must remember that even in the 1960s Black football players didn't have the opportunities they do today. The University of Florida didn't have its first Black player until 1968. Alabama's and Mississippi's football programs didn't integrate until 1971.

I was born in 1966. It is unfathomable to think that in my lifetime, Black athletes still weren't being recruited to some major public universities.

HBCU football is historically underfunded and took on less importance for Black athletes once big-time programs integrated. But it's enjoyed a revival in recent years, in part because of Deion Sanders taking over the Jackson (Ala.) State program.

The charismatic former NFL star and TV personality has advocated for better funding of HBCU football. ESPN and other national media have covered the Sanders and Jackson State story endlessly, including his much-hyped recruiting successes. There are more HBCU games on TV and streaming services than ever.

Washington's thoughts on Coach Prime?

"When you can shine a light and shine it brightly, that's a good thing," Washington said. "We'll see what the result of it all will be, but I think his heart and his intentions are legitimate and that's what matters to me."

Washington paused.

"Is he helping A&T? No," he said, chuckling and drawing out the "o" for a beat. "But I support him. I think he's legitimate in what he's doing."

That endorsement from an HBCU lifer, one who's seen the other side, is one Sanders should deeply appreciate.

Weekend rain may make weekend events tough to attend

With rain in the forecast, events taking place across the Triad this weekend are keeping a close eye on the radar and hoping for the best.GREENSBORO, N.C. — As the weekend gets closer and closer, some events taking place on Saturday and Sunday are making sure to stay weather aware.One of many events happening this weekend is the Balloon Festival sponsored by ALCOVETS.At Cedar Rock Park in Alamance County, you'll see hot air balloons taking flig...

With rain in the forecast, events taking place across the Triad this weekend are keeping a close eye on the radar and hoping for the best.

GREENSBORO, N.C. — As the weekend gets closer and closer, some events taking place on Saturday and Sunday are making sure to stay weather aware.

One of many events happening this weekend is the Balloon Festival sponsored by ALCOVETS.

At Cedar Rock Park in Alamance County, you'll see hot air balloons taking flight, weather permitting.

As an outdoor event with food trucks, vendors, live entertainment, and of course, flying hot air balloons, Balloons Operations Director, Marsha Lambertson, said the weather could impact this event.

"Balloons operate in really fair weather conditions so we like no rain unlimited visibility and nice calm winds,” Lambertson explains.

In severe weather instances, there likely won't be live entertainment at the Balloon Festival, or hot air balloons taking flight.

“If it’s sporadic rain we can work in between that. We will put the balloons in a flight hold in the event of a downpour situation but other than that we will be prepared to perform and put on a good show,“ Lambertson said, optimistic about the weekend weather.

She said there used to be a balloon festival in Alamance County 20 years ago so organizers are eager and ready to get it back up and running, or should we say flying.

"I think it’s important to get back and enjoy the community itself and to support the local community and just have a sense of being a part of something," Lambertson said.

Other events happening this weekend are the Folk Festival and Central Carolina Fair at the Greensboro coliseum.

“The festival is rain or shine we have several venues that are covered either by tents or they are indoors so we encourage people to come out as long as it safe the show is going to go on if we do need to take breaks it’ll probably just be periodic ones we make those announcements from stage but otherwise we encourage people to come down and find a covered or uncovered spot to hang out for the weekend," said President and CEO of the festival, Amy Grossman.

The North Carolina Folk Festival happens every September and features hundreds of artists on different stages with continuous performances.

The Festival has always attracted large crowds of people to the downtown Greensboro area.

“The North Carolina Folk Festival brings incredible opportunity for people to engage with performances to be in community to convene in community and ways where they’re either audience members watching what’s going on, on stage but we also have a lot of ways that people can participate in the art making," explained Grossmann.

This three-day, free, festival starts Friday at Lebauer park.

N.C. A&T faces 'a great challenge' in visiting No. 1 North Dakota State

COVID’s effects on the N.C. A&T football program might be felt nearly 1,400 miles away Saturday.All the way in Fargo, N.D.That’s the home of the No. 1-ranked North Dakota State program, and that’s where Coach Sam Washington’s Aggies will play Saturday.The challenge is mighty, with A&T coming off a 28-13 loss to N.C. Central in Charlotte and North Dakota State having routed Drake 56-14 to open their seasons.The vision, going back to 2016, was to pit A&T, coming off a Black colleg...

COVID’s effects on the N.C. A&T football program might be felt nearly 1,400 miles away Saturday.

All the way in Fargo, N.D.

That’s the home of the No. 1-ranked North Dakota State program, and that’s where Coach Sam Washington’s Aggies will play Saturday.

The challenge is mighty, with A&T coming off a 28-13 loss to N.C. Central in Charlotte and North Dakota State having routed Drake 56-14 to open their seasons.

The vision, going back to 2016, was to pit A&T, coming off a Black college national championship the previous season, against the Bison, which had just won its fifth straight Football Championship Subdivision national title.

“People wanted to see two national champions play,” A&T athletics director Earl Hilton said this week. “Visited with Coach (Rod Broadway at the time); we knew when we would have our best chance to have a good showing from a maturity standpoint, having enough players at the right age to be respectable in that contest.

A&T, like most FCS programs, didn’t play football in 2020. So instead of meeting as planned, after A&T would’ve claimed three more Black college titles and after the Bison would’ve snagged three more FCS titles, they’ll play this weekend.

“We are now in a much different posture,” Hilton said.

North Dakota State added another championship in fall 2021 after losing in the quarterfinals of the delayed 2020 season that May, and that marks nine national titles in the last 11 seasons.

A&T is not only coming off a 5-6 record in fall 2021, but the Aggies lost to N.C. Central in Charlotte last weekend to open the season.

“When we put them on schedule, we were a lot closer to being ready to play at this level,” said Washington, who took over as head coach in 2018 after Broadway retired. “And now, after COVID, they went this way, and we went the opposite way. That’s just unfortunate.

“Our team is a group of sophomores. That’s what it is, sophomores and freshmen. We’re going to go through some growing pains. But at the end, everybody’s going to be happy with the results.”

A&T is getting just more than $200,000 from North Dakota State to make the trip, although travel expenses come out of that.

“That’s what the guarantee is basically for, to get us out there,” Hilton said. “I’m not flying across the country to play. I’ve got too many good games within 200 miles of my campus. If you want us, we’ll be happy to come, but it’s got to be cost-neutral for us.”

Washington is up for a challenge, of course. “A great challenge,” he calls it.

“We match up with them in certain areas,” he said. “Can we hold out?”

And he laughs at the thought that the game’s origin dated to Broadway’s days as the head coach and his as an assistant coach.

“He definitely wouldn’t have said ‘play ‘em,’” Washington said of Broadway with a laugh. “He would have been so upset if he had to play them.”

But it was Broadway, in the end, who delivered the news to Washington that the teams would meet in 2020.

“Coach Broadway came up to me one day and said, ‘Man, you’re going to be playing North Dakota State in 2020,’” Washington said. “That’s how I found out.”

He’s just not clear where to deflect the, um, credit for arranging the matchup.

“I’m not sure,” Washington said. “I’m assuming that he and Mr. Hilton: One of them did.

“I know who didn’t. Now that’s what I can tell you,” he added with a laugh.

“Would that be you?” a reporter asked.

“That would be me,” he said.

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