Roofing Contractor inCottageville, SC.

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Local Roofers Cottageville, SC

When it comes to protection, few features are as important as the roof above your head. Your roof is much more than just a hat for your house - it keeps outside elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind outside so you and your family can stay comfortable and dry inside. A properly maintained roof also helps protect your home's structural integrity, keeps critters out, and insulates your home during cold months. With all that said, it's easy to see why your roof plays such a crucial role in your everyday life. That's why, when your roof needs maintenance or replacement, you need to work with experienced, trustworthy roofers in Cottageville, SC.

Hixon's Roofing has been Cottageville's go-to contractor for new roof installations and repairs for nearly three decades. As locals in the Cottageville community, we pride ourselves on honesty, hard work, and being a business that you can count on consistently. There's no secret as to why our company is successful. The bottom line is that we do right by our customers and treat them the way we would like our own family to be treated. That's why, when you hire Hixon's Roofing, you'll be greeted with a warm smile and provided the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina.

When you work with Hixon's Roofing, you're not working with a mediocre roofing company in Cottageville. You're working with a team of experts who are fully insured, bonded, and licensed for your peace of mind. If you're looking for the best service and the best products in the roofing industry, look no further than Hixon's Roofing.

Service Areas

Unlike some of our competitors, we choose to put our customers first before everything else. When you choose to do business with Hixon's Roofing, you're also choosing:

  • A locally owned and operated roofing company in Cottageville
  • A full-service roofing business that works on ALL types of roofs and provides emergency 24-hour service.
  • A trained, on-site foreman for roofing jobs that we complete.
  • A 10-year warranty on all architectural shingle work.
  • A 5-year warranty on three-tab roofs and metal roof repair in Cottageville.
  • A roofing business that works with your home insurance provider from start to finish.
 Commercial Roofing Cottageville, SC

There's a reason why Hixon's Roofing is considered the best roofing company in South Carolina. Instead of talking about why it would be our pleasure to show you in person. Whether your residential roof needs inspecting or your commercial structure needs a replacement, we're here to serve you.

The Top Residential Roofing Contractor in Cottageville, SC

Hixon's has seen and done it all when it comes to residential roofing services in South Carolina. Whether you own a small, secluded ranch-style home or a sprawling mansion in the suburbs, we have the expertise and tools to accommodate any job. Do you need a small leak fixed on your asphalt roof? No problem, we've got you covered. Are you in need of a brand-new roof built from scratch? We can help you with that, too. At Hixon' Roofing, we pride ourselves on combining top-notch roofing services with family values. Trust, honesty, and hard work mean a lot to us. We treat your home and yard just like we would treat our own. If we create trash or debris in your yard, we clean it up. It all goes back to treating our customers how we would like to be treated - something that Hixon's has been doing since 1984.

 Local Roofing Contractors Cottageville, SC

What types of residential roofing services do we offer in Cottageville? Here are some of our most common job requests:

Roof-Repair
Roof Repair

Our team specializes in all forms of roof repair, from minor leaks to major structural issues.

New Roofs
New Roofs

We will build you a new roof from scratch, using high-quality materials. If you have a vision, we can make it a reality.

Re-Roofing
Re-Roofing

Depending on your needs, we can remove your old roof and install a new roof on your home.

Roofing Materials Replacement
Roofing Materials Replacement

We will replace your old, worn-out shingles, metals, and other roofing materials.

We provide quality craftsmanship and products because we believe in what we do. We want happy customers who refer their friends and family. You may not see flashy internet ads everywhere for our company, but that's by design. Our word-of-mouth referrals are so frequent and far-reaching that we don't need to pay for ad spots. We would rather invest that money into the best tools and most knowledgeable roofing experts available. That way, we can better serve our customers.

Because, at the end of the day, your satisfaction is our #1 priority.

Roof Repair in Cottageville, SC

Your home's roof is exposed to the elements 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. As a homeowner, you probably do your best to keep your roof in good condition with regular maintenance and inspections. However, even properly maintained roofs can be damaged without notice. Mother Nature has her own set of rules, and when she chooses to unleash her power on your roof, there isn't too much you can do.

If your roof is leaking, growing moss, or your shingles are cracked, it's time to call the pros. You need contractors that are efficient, effective, and on-time. That's where Hixon's Roofing comes in.

Hixon's Roofing will provide quality roofing repairs for homes and businesses with all types of roofs. Whether you have a small, single-story home with a minor leak or a sprawling estate with multiple roofing issues, Hixon's will get your roof back to new in no time. It doesn't matter if we installed your roof or not, Hixon's will provide top-notch customer service and the highest quality roofing repairs in Cottageville.

 Residential Roofing Company Cottageville, SC

While some situations like downed trees require obvious roof repair, it's not always clear when your roof needs some TLC. Keep these common signs in mind the next time you do a visual inspection of your roof:

 Roofers Near Me Cottageville, SC
Cracked or Missing Shingles:

If the shingles on your roof are cracked or curling, you can safely assume that they are nearing the end of their lifespan. If you notice shingles missing, it's an obvious sign that your roof needs some repair.

 Roofing And Siding Cottageville, SC
Shingle Grit in Gutters:

Asphalt and composite shingles will shed granules over time, especially when they're starting to wear out. Often, these granules find their way into your gutter system. When you're cleaning your gutters this quarter, keep an eye out for this course, black grit. It's a telltale sign that your roof may need attention or repair.

 Home Roofing Contractors Cottageville, SC
Sagging Roof Deck:

It's a good idea for every homeowner to check their attics for signs of leaks and general disrepair. While you're up there, look at the ceiling in your attic. If you notice the rafters or decking is sagging towards the ground, you could have a serious problem on your hands caused by a leak. If your roof deck is sagging, call Hixon's as soon as possible for an inspection. If the damage is localized, you can often avoid a full roof replacement.

 Roofing Companies Cottageville, SC
Roof Flashing Deterioration:

The flashing around your chimney, skylight, and attic vents is a seal that keeps rain and other elements outside of your home. However, with time, flashing can crack or even break, which will lead to a leak in your home. This is most common in older homes that have flashing made of tar or cement. For many homeowners, the prospect of climbing up on a roof to check flashing isn't an option. In that case, you should call a team of professional roofers to inspect for you.

 Roofing Services Cottageville, SC
Moss Growth:

Moss can add some charming character to your home, but in most cases, if you see moss growth, it means trouble. Moss (like fungi and mold) indicates that there could be moisture trapped in your roof's structure. When left untreated, this moisture can ruin your roof. You can get rid of the moss by using a stiff brush to wipe it away but be sure you address any underlying problems as well.

New Roof Installation inCottageville, SC

As a full-service roofing company, our team of expert roofers has installed hundreds of new roofs in South Carolina. Whether you need a metal roof for your secluded home in the woods or a new roof for your commercial business, we're here to make the installation process easy and streamlined.

It all starts when you call our office for a free estimate. We'll take all the time you need to go over your new roof installation options to customize the structure and style to your needs. Once we have defined the project's details, our roof installation professionals will get to work on your home or business. Unlike some roofing companies in Cottageville, Hixon's is transparent about every step of the installation process. We keep our clients informed at all times and are happy to provide updates as we make progress on your new roof. While we are installing your new roof, we treat your home or business like our own. You can always count on friendly interactions and a clean and tidy work area. After your new roof is installed, we'll clean up behind ourselves so it's like we were never there.

When you hire Hixon's Roofing to install a roof on your home or business, know that we only use the highest-quality materials and the best construction techniques available. That way, you'll have a fantastic-looking roof that will last for decades. On top of our unmatched workmanship, clients also receive a 10-year labor warranty on architectural shingles and a 5-year labor warranty on three-tab and metal roofs.

Local Roofers Cottageville, SC

Commercial Roofing Services inCottageville, SC

Residential and commercial roofing are similar in that they both require experienced contractors to perform quality work. However, unlike residential roofing (a more straightforward process), commercial roofing projects can be complicated and lengthy. In our experience, there can be dozens of factors to be considered to complete the job correctly. Commercial roofing contractors in Cottageville, SC, must account for rooftop HVAC systems, external piping, external utilities, and more. Because commercial roofing structures typically have many layers, it's more difficult to find and remediate leaks. As such, our commercial roofing contractors have different skillsets than residential roofing pros.

Like the residential side of our business, we have completed hundreds of commercial roofing projects in South Carolina. We know exactly what it takes to repair, install, or inspect a commercial roof. When businesses in South Carolina need roofing work, they come to Hixon's Roofing because they know that we will get the job done right the first time. They know that our team is dependable, friendly, and highly qualified to accomplish any commercial roofing project. We're talking roof repairs for small offices to new roof installations on huge, multi-building industrial complexes.

If you're starting a commercial roofing project, don't settle for mediocre roofing contractors. After all, a commercial roofing project can be a huge investment, and you need to get your money's worth. Hixon's is here to exceed your expectations and take on any commercial roofing needs you may have, whether they're minor fixes or major roofing replacements.

 Commercial Roofing Cottageville, SC

The Hixon's Advantage

At Hixon's Roofing, we make it difficult for any other roofing company to compete with our helpful and professional services. For more information about our company and what we can do for your home or business, contact our office in Cottageville. Our customer service reps have the knowledge and information to answer your questions and get the ball rolling on your roofing project in South Carolina today.

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Latest News in Cottageville, SC

Parents express concern over Colleton County Schools’ new bell schedule

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Some Colleton County elementary schoolers will have to be at the bus stop as early as 6 a.m. starting this school year, and parents are not happy.The district just announced its new bell schedule within a month of the first day of school, and it is already receiving backlash, especially on Facebook.The schools affected by the new bell schedule are listed below:7:00 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.- Bells Elementary School- Cottageville Elementary School- Hendersonville Elementary School...

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Some Colleton County elementary schoolers will have to be at the bus stop as early as 6 a.m. starting this school year, and parents are not happy.

The district just announced its new bell schedule within a month of the first day of school, and it is already receiving backlash, especially on Facebook.

The schools affected by the new bell schedule are listed below:

7:00 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

- Bells Elementary School

- Cottageville Elementary School

- Hendersonville Elementary School

8:00 a.m. - 2:45 p.m.

- Northside Elementary School

- Forest Hills Elementary School

- Black Street Early Childhood Center

8:45 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

- Colleton County Middle School

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

- Colleton County High School

Most parents say they do not want their elementary schoolers starting so early and their high schoolers ending so late.

Kevin Canaday, a father of three kids in Colleton County School District, says this is causing issues for parents who rely on childcare services after school. He says it is creating 11–12-hour days for elementary schoolers.

“Elementary schools K-4, K-5, first graders, who are getting their foundations of education and having them start this early in the day, so they’re getting out of school if I remember correctly is 1:45,” Canaday said. “So, by the time they get home, there’s really not going to be anyone there to help them with homework or anything like that because they’re getting home so early.”

William Bowman Jr., the chairperson for Colleton County Schools, says this change came from a shortage of bus drivers. He says the district should have 65 drivers, but they are short 15 for this school year.

He says Dr. Vallerie Cave, Colleton County Schools’ Superintendent, did not want bus drivers to be making triple or quadruple routes to fill in for the missing drivers. He says if they did this, it would result in kids not arriving at school until 10 or 11:00 in the morning.

“We’re seeing a lot of growth in all of our core subject areas across all of our grade levels,” Bowman Jr. said. “So, we want to continue with that academic progress, and a big part of that continuation is making sure that our students receive the proper instruction. And if students are getting to school at 10 or 11:00 in the morning, they’re missing a huge part of instruction.”

Bowman says he encourages everyone to apply to be a bus driver for Colleton County School District.

There will also be a school board meeting on Tuesday, July 26 at 6 p.m., where the board will explain more of why they made these changes.

The South Carolina Department of Education recently launched the “Step Up SC” campaign, which highlights open bus driver and technician positions across the state.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Cottageville store plays host to History Channel’s ‘American Pickers’

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and...

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.

The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.

Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.

“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and, at the time, Frank Fritz, who travel to junkyards and antique stores all over the country to find valuables and collectibles to buy and resale.

The Hunt brothers were always fans of the show and Brad said he and their mother Dorothy would watch it together over the years. Dorothy passed away last January and after Bruce and Brad acquired the old business, Brad decided to reach out to the show.

Hunt’s general store was operational in Cottageville from about the 1930s to 1989. Grandsons of the original owner and founder were on the “American Pickers” show which airs this weekend. The bottom photo is a house next door to the store. (Photo Provided)

“We have a lot of old stuff that I’ve seen them buy and I thought they’d like to look through (it). We watched the show a lot (and) it kind of felt like (we) knew them before they got there. They were very personable. They were there to work; they were cordial,” Brad Hunt said.

Cottageville was one of two stops in West Virginia, and Brad said the episode will delve into his family’s history and grandfather’s legacy.

“A lot of them are excited about telling the backstory; that’s a lot of the show on top of them buying and reselling stuff,” Brad Hunt said.

Lawrence “L.O.’s” store was a catch-all place that sold milk, groceries, hardware, guns, appliances and clothing. It was also a butcher shop.

“Those were common back then. There were not Walmarts, and every little community had its own little store that had everything,” Brad Hunt said.

L.O. ran the store until his passing in the ’90s, except when he was serving in World War II, during which time his brothers worked in his place. L.O. was a postmaster in the Navy and Cottageville, and his store was also the local post office at the time.

“He was the judge, jury and executioner; he kind of ran the town. He was a community servant,” Brad Hunt said.

Going forward, Brad says he and Bruce want to use the space as a man cave where they can store tools, work on projects and spend time together.

“We’re going to use a lot of the old stuff for decoration,” he said.

Mark Whitley, director of Jackson County Economic Development, said he’s looking forward to watching the episode since he’s a huge fan of the show.

“I never try to miss an episode and when they come into a community, it opens up our eyes to different parts of the country that we normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to see,” Whitley said. “Any kind of exposure we can get from this is going to be very beneficial.”

Whitley said Jackson County has a rich history and he’s grateful for the Hunt brothers’ work to be featured on the show.

“Jackson County residents have so many interesting treasures, I think they could spend quite a few days here and not even scratch the surface for the things that would be of interest to the national population,” he said.

When “American Pickers” features a piece of Jackson County history, Brad Hunt hopes people across the nation will learn something about the community’s culture.

“I wish my mother was still alive to be able to see it and participate. It was a fun experience and we hope everybody enjoys getting a little history lesson of the little town of Cottageville and our grandfather,” he said.

The show airs 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8, on the History Channel.

Candice Black can be reached at cblack@newsandsentinel.com.

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Forested area near Good Hope Landing along Edisto River protected, transferred to SC DNR

COTTAGEVILLE — A tract of nearly 150 acres of hardwood trees along the Edisto River — home to guarded bird species like the wood stork — was recently transferred to the state for conservation and is now protected.The property, situated adjacent to the popular Good Hope Landing, provides a number of wetland benefits: floodwater storage, wildlife habitat and protection of drinking water quality.Several rare, threatened and endangered species — such as the red-cockaded woodpecker and southern bald eagle, th...

COTTAGEVILLE — A tract of nearly 150 acres of hardwood trees along the Edisto River — home to guarded bird species like the wood stork — was recently transferred to the state for conservation and is now protected.

The property, situated adjacent to the popular Good Hope Landing, provides a number of wetland benefits: floodwater storage, wildlife habitat and protection of drinking water quality.

Several rare, threatened and endangered species — such as the red-cockaded woodpecker and southern bald eagle, the Atlantic sturgeon fish and Carolina birds-in-a-nest flower — call the space home.

Additionally, about a third of all state priority fish species are found in the surrounding Edisto River system.

And since this tract is immediately downstream from the landing, it is either the first or last site users see when they’re getting on or off the river.

The big hardwood trees there, probably second growth after being logged decades ago, have a huge impact on the landing’s users and are aesthetically important to protect, said Patrick Moore, a senior project manager at Open Space Institute.

The institute this month announced the land transfer to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources. The property sits across from the 1,375-acre Edisto River Wildlife Management Area, which the state also oversees.

The addition of this land to the wildlife management area means creating a safeguard of public and recreational access and drinking water for downstream communities, said Nate Berry, OSI’s senior vice president in South Carolina.

A number of groups chipped in to make the move possible, including the Waste Management company, the S.C. Conservation Bank and the Coastal Conservation League.

When environmentalists heard the property was going to be sold and possibly logged, OSI stepped in and purchased it to keep that from happening, Moore said. Waste Management contributed funds for the effort, too, and DNR secured a grant from the conservation bank for the transfer.

“Acquisition of this property will protect another important parcel along the Edisto, one of the longest, free-flowing rivers in the United States that provides critical habitat for game and non-game species,” said DNR Director Robert Boyles.

The Edisto is the longest blackwater river in the country, meandering some 250 miles from Edgefield and Saluda counties to the Atlantic Ocean at Edisto Island, according to the state Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

Boyles said DNR is appreciative of partnering with the other organizations to provide more land where the public can enjoy outdoor activities. The river already has a 62-mile canoe and kayak trail that offers camping and picnic sites for single and multi-day trips, according to a news release.

With the addition of the property near Good Hope Landing, OSI has conserved more than 35,000 acres in South Carolina over the past five years.

Historic Walterboro church must hand over property to Episcopal Church in S.C. Supreme Court ruling

A long-awaited ruling passed down last week by the S.C. Supreme Court has the future of one of Walterboro’s oldest and most historic churches hanging in the balance.St. Jude’s Church members in Walterboro will be losing the rights to their property and to their church. The church was established in 1855 and are in the historic district of downtown Walterboro.This ruling was passed down by the S.C. Supreme Court, which has been listening to the legal battle between the Anglican and Episcopal churches for the last 10 ...

A long-awaited ruling passed down last week by the S.C. Supreme Court has the future of one of Walterboro’s oldest and most historic churches hanging in the balance.

St. Jude’s Church members in Walterboro will be losing the rights to their property and to their church. The church was established in 1855 and are in the historic district of downtown Walterboro.

This ruling was passed down by the S.C. Supreme Court, which has been listening to the legal battle between the Anglican and Episcopal churches for the last 10 years. According to the legal opinion, some parishes broke away from the Episcopal Church more than 10 years ago, prompting the ongoing legal battle about property rights. Before the split, all churches were a part of a trust that belongs to the national Episcopal church.

The S.C. Supreme Court issued their ruling on April 20th.

As part of their ruling, 14 of the 29 now-Anglican churches involved in this legal decision – impacted churches are scattered throughout the Lowcountry, from Charleston to Colleton counties – will lose all rights to their property and must begin the legal process of handing over their properties to the Episcopal Church. The other half of the churches involved in the lawsuit will keep their personal property and are unaffected by the Supreme Court’s ruling.

The reason that 15 of the 29 churches can keep their properties is because those churches never conceded to the church law, through the way in which the individual church laws, or “canon,” were written.

St. Jude’s is the only Anglican church in Colleton County impacted by the ruling.

“The decision from the Supreme Court is a difficult one to have learned. Our hearts mourn at the loss of historic buildings where we have worshipped for generations,” said Rev. Newman H. Lawrence, rector of St. Jude’s Church in Walterboro. “But, we know the church is more than a building. We will continue to gather and worship the risen Lord wherever that may be,” he said.

While the ruling has been handed down, details of this case still remain in limbo as legal counsel for both sides continue to weigh in. These details include many “what ifs,” such as how the Anglican churches who are losing their properties will be reimbursed or compensated for “betterments” that were made during the last 10 years while this court case was being heard. These “betterments,” as they are called in the ruling, refer to physical improvements or expansions made to the church properties. They also refer to general upkeep.

Other “what ifs” that are still being decided as part of an ongoing legal conversation include the future of parishioner grave sites that have been bought and planned for by Anglican members; current graves and graveyards; and whether or not the new owners of the property will allow some of the Anglican churches to remain as lease-holders.

According to a letter issued on April 20th by the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina to the church’s clergy and parishioners,

“The ruling raises many issues that will have to play out in the coming weeks before any actions are taken, so our first response must be to quiet our hearts before the Lord as we pray for grace to meet the days ahead. Some of our churches are relieved that the court ruled their property does indeed belong to them. Some are grieving deeply, as the courts ruling went in the opposite direction,” stated The Rt. Rev. Chip Edgar, in his letter to all Anglican churches in the area. “ … The Lord has provided – and always will provide – all we need to proclaim the gospel, bind up the brokenhearted, heal the sick, set the captives free, do justice, love mercy, walk humbly with our God,” Edgar wrote, in part, in his letter.

Edgar also asked for continued prayers “… for those of us who are called to lead as we sort thorugh the difficult decisions of the days ahead.”

According to the S.C. Supreme Court, the 14 Anglican Churches that must hand over their properties to the Episcopal Church are:

The Church of the Good Shepherd in Charleston;

The Church of the Holy Comforter in Sumter;

St. Bartholomew’s Church in Hartsville;

St. John’s Parish Church on Johns Island;

St. Jude’s Church in Walterboro;

Saint Luke’s Church in Hilton Head;

St. David’s Church in Cheraw;

St. Matthew’s Parish Church in Fort Motte;

Old St. Andrew’s Parish Church in Charleston;

The Church of the Holy Cross in Stateburg;

Trinity Church in Myrtle Beach;

Holy Trinity Church in Charleston;

Christ Church in Mount Pleasant;

Saint James Church in James Island.

Other items that may interest you

Septic tank drama may shutter Cottageville restaurant

COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – A problem with a septic tank may force a small business in Colleton County to close its doors for good.David Stanfield and his wife opened Red Brick Pizza in Cottageville a few years ago. But they may have to close their business after South Carolina’s lead health agency, the Department of Health and Environmental Control, said their septic system is not fit for the job.“Almost two years ago we started, and almost immediately DHEC jumped on my back,” said Stanfield. “In ...

COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – A problem with a septic tank may force a small business in Colleton County to close its doors for good.

David Stanfield and his wife opened Red Brick Pizza in Cottageville a few years ago. But they may have to close their business after South Carolina’s lead health agency, the Department of Health and Environmental Control, said their septic system is not fit for the job.

“Almost two years ago we started, and almost immediately DHEC jumped on my back,” said Stanfield. “In March of last year, we started takeout only, but in March I contacted them about opening a 12-person dining room. They said yes, you can open it.”

A month later, Stanfield said he was told that could not have a dining room.

“I asked them about the tables out front – I had four picnic tables out front – they said you can have all the picnic tables you want, so we built a patio which has a bunch of outside tables. And then five months later, during another inspection, and we’ve gone through eight in one year, during another inspection they said you can’t have these outside tables. I said, well, you told us we could.”

DHEC told Stanfield that his septic tank was too small, and he was given a ‘shut door’ order.

“Two months ago, I went before the council- I begged them, I said my septic system has never overflowed, it’s never had a problem, and they said you have 60 days to put this monstrosity in back here.”

His customers were outside protesting on Tuesday while raising money to help keep them in business.

Stanfield began installing the large septic system. He says he has now spent $51,000 on the project. But his business only makes about $800-$1,000 on a good week. So, he believes he will now have to just shut down.

Stanfield eventually put a water meter on his property after a suggestion from a neighbor to see how much water was being used each day.

“Our water meter shows that we use 350 gallons per night, my existing system will do 450 gallons and they’ve got me putting in the system it will do 1,500 gallons per night which is just crazy. They’ve bankrupted me. They’ve taken every dime that we have, and we don’t even have money to open for food this week.”

DHEC sent News 2 a statement saying Stanfield was not in compliance with his DHEC permit when he moved from take-out only to restaurant seating.

“Mr. Stanfield did not dispute the grounds for suspension but requested the suspension be rescinded because he was diligently working on gaining compliance with DHEC regulations,” the statement said. “Failure to install the upgraded system would not lead to closure of the facility but would result in the return to the original food service operation as approved and permitted by DHEC.”

“I don’t understand this because, you know, America is known for if you put everything into – whatever your dream is – you can get it accomplished and they are burying us alive,” said Heike Stanfield, Co-Owner, Red Brick Pizza.

Stanfield said they were last open on Saturday. But unless a miracle happens, he believes they may not be able to re-open again.

The matter was discussed during a DHEC board meeting on May 5, 2022 with the restaurant’s owner in attendance – a motion was made about two hours and thirty-three minutes into the meeting, following an executive session. You can watch that hearing by clicking here.

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