Roofing Contractor inColumbia, SC.

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If Your Roof Needs Fixin' It's Time to Call Hixon's

Local Roofers Columbia, SC

When it comes to protection, few features are as important as the roof above your head. Your roof is much more than just a hat for your house - it keeps outside elements like rain, sleet, snow, and wind outside so you and your family can stay comfortable and dry inside. A properly maintained roof also helps protect your home's structural integrity, keeps critters out, and insulates your home during cold months. With all that said, it's easy to see why your roof plays such a crucial role in your everyday life. That's why, when your roof needs maintenance or replacement, you need to work with experienced, trustworthy roofers in Columbia, SC.

Hixon's Roofing has been Columbia's go-to contractor for new roof installations and repairs for nearly three decades. As locals in the Columbia community, we pride ourselves on honesty, hard work, and being a business that you can count on consistently. There's no secret as to why our company is successful. The bottom line is that we do right by our customers and treat them the way we would like our own family to be treated. That's why, when you hire Hixon's Roofing, you'll be greeted with a warm smile and provided the highest quality roofing services in South Carolina.

When you work with Hixon's Roofing, you're not working with a mediocre roofing company in Columbia. You're working with a team of experts who are fully insured, bonded, and licensed for your peace of mind. If you're looking for the best service and the best products in the roofing industry, look no further than Hixon's Roofing.

Service Areas

Unlike some of our competitors, we choose to put our customers first before everything else. When you choose to do business with Hixon's Roofing, you're also choosing:

  • A locally owned and operated roofing company in Columbia
  • A full-service roofing business that works on ALL types of roofs and provides emergency 24-hour service.
  • A trained, on-site foreman for roofing jobs that we complete.
  • A 10-year warranty on all architectural shingle work.
  • A 5-year warranty on three-tab roofs and metal roof repair in Columbia.
  • A roofing business that works with your home insurance provider from start to finish.
 Commercial Roofing Columbia, SC

There's a reason why Hixon's Roofing is considered the best roofing company in South Carolina. Instead of talking about why it would be our pleasure to show you in person. Whether your residential roof needs inspecting or your commercial structure needs a replacement, we're here to serve you.

The Top Residential Roofing Contractor in Columbia, SC

Hixon's has seen and done it all when it comes to residential roofing services in South Carolina. Whether you own a small, secluded ranch-style home or a sprawling mansion in the suburbs, we have the expertise and tools to accommodate any job. Do you need a small leak fixed on your asphalt roof? No problem, we've got you covered. Are you in need of a brand-new roof built from scratch? We can help you with that, too. At Hixon' Roofing, we pride ourselves on combining top-notch roofing services with family values. Trust, honesty, and hard work mean a lot to us. We treat your home and yard just like we would treat our own. If we create trash or debris in your yard, we clean it up. It all goes back to treating our customers how we would like to be treated - something that Hixon's has been doing since 1984.

 Local Roofing Contractors Columbia, SC

What types of residential roofing services do we offer in Columbia? Here are some of our most common job requests:

Roof-Repair
Roof Repair

Our team specializes in all forms of roof repair, from minor leaks to major structural issues.

New Roofs
New Roofs

We will build you a new roof from scratch, using high-quality materials. If you have a vision, we can make it a reality.

Re-Roofing
Re-Roofing

Depending on your needs, we can remove your old roof and install a new roof on your home.

Roofing Materials Replacement
Roofing Materials Replacement

We will replace your old, worn-out shingles, metals, and other roofing materials.

We provide quality craftsmanship and products because we believe in what we do. We want happy customers who refer their friends and family. You may not see flashy internet ads everywhere for our company, but that's by design. Our word-of-mouth referrals are so frequent and far-reaching that we don't need to pay for ad spots. We would rather invest that money into the best tools and most knowledgeable roofing experts available. That way, we can better serve our customers.

Because, at the end of the day, your satisfaction is our #1 priority.

Roof Repair in Columbia, SC

Your home's roof is exposed to the elements 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. As a homeowner, you probably do your best to keep your roof in good condition with regular maintenance and inspections. However, even properly maintained roofs can be damaged without notice. Mother Nature has her own set of rules, and when she chooses to unleash her power on your roof, there isn't too much you can do.

If your roof is leaking, growing moss, or your shingles are cracked, it's time to call the pros. You need contractors that are efficient, effective, and on-time. That's where Hixon's Roofing comes in.

Hixon's Roofing will provide quality roofing repairs for homes and businesses with all types of roofs. Whether you have a small, single-story home with a minor leak or a sprawling estate with multiple roofing issues, Hixon's will get your roof back to new in no time. It doesn't matter if we installed your roof or not, Hixon's will provide top-notch customer service and the highest quality roofing repairs in Columbia.

 Residential Roofing Company Columbia, SC

While some situations like downed trees require obvious roof repair, it's not always clear when your roof needs some TLC. Keep these common signs in mind the next time you do a visual inspection of your roof:

 Roofers Near Me Columbia, SC
Cracked or Missing Shingles:

If the shingles on your roof are cracked or curling, you can safely assume that they are nearing the end of their lifespan. If you notice shingles missing, it's an obvious sign that your roof needs some repair.

 Roofing And Siding Columbia, SC
Shingle Grit in Gutters:

Asphalt and composite shingles will shed granules over time, especially when they're starting to wear out. Often, these granules find their way into your gutter system. When you're cleaning your gutters this quarter, keep an eye out for this course, black grit. It's a telltale sign that your roof may need attention or repair.

 Home Roofing Contractors Columbia, SC
Sagging Roof Deck:

It's a good idea for every homeowner to check their attics for signs of leaks and general disrepair. While you're up there, look at the ceiling in your attic. If you notice the rafters or decking is sagging towards the ground, you could have a serious problem on your hands caused by a leak. If your roof deck is sagging, call Hixon's as soon as possible for an inspection. If the damage is localized, you can often avoid a full roof replacement.

 Roofing Companies Columbia, SC
Roof Flashing Deterioration:

The flashing around your chimney, skylight, and attic vents is a seal that keeps rain and other elements outside of your home. However, with time, flashing can crack or even break, which will lead to a leak in your home. This is most common in older homes that have flashing made of tar or cement. For many homeowners, the prospect of climbing up on a roof to check flashing isn't an option. In that case, you should call a team of professional roofers to inspect for you.

 Roofing Services Columbia, SC
Moss Growth:

Moss can add some charming character to your home, but in most cases, if you see moss growth, it means trouble. Moss (like fungi and mold) indicates that there could be moisture trapped in your roof's structure. When left untreated, this moisture can ruin your roof. You can get rid of the moss by using a stiff brush to wipe it away but be sure you address any underlying problems as well.

New Roof Installation inColumbia, SC

As a full-service roofing company, our team of expert roofers has installed hundreds of new roofs in South Carolina. Whether you need a metal roof for your secluded home in the woods or a new roof for your commercial business, we're here to make the installation process easy and streamlined.

It all starts when you call our office for a free estimate. We'll take all the time you need to go over your new roof installation options to customize the structure and style to your needs. Once we have defined the project's details, our roof installation professionals will get to work on your home or business. Unlike some roofing companies in Columbia, Hixon's is transparent about every step of the installation process. We keep our clients informed at all times and are happy to provide updates as we make progress on your new roof. While we are installing your new roof, we treat your home or business like our own. You can always count on friendly interactions and a clean and tidy work area. After your new roof is installed, we'll clean up behind ourselves so it's like we were never there.

When you hire Hixon's Roofing to install a roof on your home or business, know that we only use the highest-quality materials and the best construction techniques available. That way, you'll have a fantastic-looking roof that will last for decades. On top of our unmatched workmanship, clients also receive a 10-year labor warranty on architectural shingles and a 5-year labor warranty on three-tab and metal roofs.

Local Roofers Columbia, SC

Commercial Roofing Services inColumbia, SC

Residential and commercial roofing are similar in that they both require experienced contractors to perform quality work. However, unlike residential roofing (a more straightforward process), commercial roofing projects can be complicated and lengthy. In our experience, there can be dozens of factors to be considered to complete the job correctly. Commercial roofing contractors in Columbia, SC, must account for rooftop HVAC systems, external piping, external utilities, and more. Because commercial roofing structures typically have many layers, it's more difficult to find and remediate leaks. As such, our commercial roofing contractors have different skillsets than residential roofing pros.

Like the residential side of our business, we have completed hundreds of commercial roofing projects in South Carolina. We know exactly what it takes to repair, install, or inspect a commercial roof. When businesses in South Carolina need roofing work, they come to Hixon's Roofing because they know that we will get the job done right the first time. They know that our team is dependable, friendly, and highly qualified to accomplish any commercial roofing project. We're talking roof repairs for small offices to new roof installations on huge, multi-building industrial complexes.

If you're starting a commercial roofing project, don't settle for mediocre roofing contractors. After all, a commercial roofing project can be a huge investment, and you need to get your money's worth. Hixon's is here to exceed your expectations and take on any commercial roofing needs you may have, whether they're minor fixes or major roofing replacements.

 Commercial Roofing Columbia, SC

The Hixon's Advantage

At Hixon's Roofing, we make it difficult for any other roofing company to compete with our helpful and professional services. For more information about our company and what we can do for your home or business, contact our office in Columbia. Our customer service reps have the knowledge and information to answer your questions and get the ball rolling on your roofing project in South Carolina today.

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Latest News in Columbia, SC

DHEC confirms multiple cases of human West Nile Virus, declares outbreak in Richland County

Residents are urged to protect themselves as the City of Columbia continues to spray for mosquitoes.COLUMBIA, S.C. — While City of Columbia has been alerted of the human transmission of West Nile virus in the city, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has reported six human cases in Richland County in 2022. The virus is transmitted to the blood system through ...

Residents are urged to protect themselves as the City of Columbia continues to spray for mosquitoes.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — While City of Columbia has been alerted of the human transmission of West Nile virus in the city, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has reported six human cases in Richland County in 2022. The virus is transmitted to the blood system through infected mosquito bites. DHEC is alerting residents because of multiple confirmed birds, mosquitos, and human cases clustered in time and geographic location.

DHEC considers these cases in humans and animals to amount to an outbreak in progress and urges residents to used protective measures against mosquitos, including repellants.

While the City of Columbia is continuing its practice of spraying for adult mosquitoes through the remainder of the season, residents are urged to protect themselves by:

The city's spraying to control the mosquito population is usually conducted between midnight and dawn; however, it is possible for spraying to happen earlier depending on conditions. Residents allergic to the products permethrin, deltamethrin, or tau-fluvalinate should notify vector control staff by calling the City of Columbia Code Enforcement Office at 803-545-4229.

All beekeepers should call code enforcement to notify staff of their hives.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says most people (eight out of 10) will not develop any symptoms of West Nile. However, about one in five people do develop symptoms that include headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea, or rash. Most people with febrile illness due to West Nile virus recover completely, but fatigue and weakness can last for weeks or months.

About one in 150 people develop serious symptoms that affect the central nervous system such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord).

If you suspect you have contracted West Nile virus, see your healthcare provider for treatment.

There is no vaccine or specific medicine available for the treatment of West Nile virus infection. Over-the-counter medication may relieve symptoms and can reduce fever. In severe cases, patients often need to be hospitalized to receive supportive treatment, such as intravenous fluids, pain medication, and nursing care.

Some SC manufacturers rethinking tax deals amid law change

COLUMBIA — Owen Steel had already gone before the Richland County Council once seeking a reduction in its property tax rate as it prepared to invest $3 million in its Bluff Road facility when the company’s lawyer called.State lawmakers had just passed legislation that would automatically take Owen Steel down to the tax rate it was seeking. Not just ...

COLUMBIA — Owen Steel had already gone before the Richland County Council once seeking a reduction in its property tax rate as it prepared to invest $3 million in its Bluff Road facility when the company’s lawyer called.

State lawmakers had just passed legislation that would automatically take Owen Steel down to the tax rate it was seeking. Not just Owen Steel but all manufacturers in the state saw a 4.5 percent reduction in tax rates overnight. The new law essentially took them from being assessed at a rate of 10.5 percent to 6 percent — the same rate paid on commercial property, apartments and second homes in South Carolina.

Some quick number crunching told company leaders that they were better off without signing the county’s deal, Owen Steel President David Zalesne said.

“It really was fortuitous timing from our standpoint,” he said.

The legislation signed into law by Gov. Henry McMaster this year has some manufacturers, and the lawyers who represent them, rethinking their approach to economic development deals in South Carolina.

“We were all very surprised that that particular provision passed,” said Burnie Maybank, a tax lawyer with Nexsen Pruet who specializes in drawing up the tax incentive deals counties use to lure in new industry.

Before, these deals were routinely inked by county economic development directors trying to make up for a state industrial property tax rate that was among the highest in the country and made it difficult to compete with neighboring states for new investment.

Executives are now weighing whether the gains they get from signing a deal — like freezing millage, the other rate that goes into calculating a property’s taxes, for several decades — outweigh the benefits they give up — like a five-year property tax abatement from counties, Maybank said.

For Owen Steel, the $3 million investment in new equipment was relatively small when stacked beside the $50 million, $100 million or $200 million deals often signed by new companies choosing to relocate to South Carolina. For Zalesne, the tax abatement, which is not available to companies signing fee-in-lieu incentive agreements, was worth more than other potential savings.

That county abatement typically makes up 20 to 30 percent of a property owner’s tax bill, according to Maybank.

“There’s more certainty with a fee-in-lieu agreement, but we thought the benefits of going with the new tax structure outweighed the risk,” Zalesne said.

Maybank said the novelty of the tax law changes means the lawyers negotiating incentive deals likely haven’t yet seen the full impact of the adjustments. But he said he’s been advising his clients seeking smaller deals, those in the investment range of $15 million or less, they’re likely better off without them.

“The companies don’t want to fool with them,” Maybank said.

It’s also a benefit to the counties because the state has agreed to reimburse them for the lost tax revenue as a result of the rate reduction, although that reimbursement has a statewide cap of $170 million.

But the Palmetto State should still expect to see companies with larger investments shelling out money for legal fees as they seek to ink tax deals despite the rate reduction, Maybank said.

That’s because as the population in many South Carolina cities grows and inflation is on the rise nationally, cities, counties and school boards will have the option to raise millage rates.

State tax law caps increases in millage rates — which are equivalent to $1 of tax per $1,000 of a property’s assessed value — but rising inflation and population is lifting those limits for probably the first time in a decade, Maybank said.

Last year, governments were flush with federal coronavirus relief money. But those dollars are starting to run out.

“For years you didn’t see it; now, you’re going to see it,” Maybank said. “Increase in millage has people a little nervous. So for large deals, capping millage is worth it.”

There is the additional risk state lawmakers could turn around and repeal the rate reduction, leaving those companies that bypassed a tax agreement with no redress.

Zalesne said the benefits also depend on the nature of the deal.

Counties may agree to offer tax incentives because the deals often come with the promise of new jobs. But if a company is making an investment in factory automation to replace the labor it either can’t find or afford amid South Carolina’s low rate of unemployment, a tax deal becomes less lucrative due to the hiring targets involved.

“The workforce is already spread thin among existing companies,” Zalesne said. “You either have to train more people or invest in equipment to get the work done.”

Companies and counties may make a number of other adjustments to how they approach economic development, Maybank said.

Some counties have created mechanisms called multicounty business parks. These “parks” are often in name only, with no set location within a county, but they allow governments to put other tax buydowns in place

“You’ll definitely still see those,” Maybank said. “And you may start seeing those used to lock in millage.”

On the other hand, counties are likely to get pickier about what they do and don’t allow.

“It would have to be for something the county or city really wants to see happen,” Maybank said.

Running game, special teams loom large

South Carolina fans are ready for "Beamer Ball" before an NCAA college football game against Georgia State, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022, in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/Artie Walker Jr.)FAYETTEVILLE — Seems the South Carolina Gamecocks likely will run into trouble against Arkansas, yet in special ways could bedevil the Razorbacks.Both 1-0 teams play their SEC opener at 11 a.m. today on ESPN at Reynolds Razorback Stadium.Coach Shane Beamer’s unranked Gamecocks of the SEC East won their seas...

South Carolina fans are ready for "Beamer Ball" before an NCAA college football game against Georgia State, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022, in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/Artie Walker Jr.)

FAYETTEVILLE — Seems the South Carolina Gamecocks likely will run into trouble against Arkansas, yet in special ways could bedevil the Razorbacks.

Both 1-0 teams play their SEC opener at 11 a.m. today on ESPN at Reynolds Razorback Stadium.

Coach Shane Beamer’s unranked Gamecocks of the SEC East won their season opener 35-14 last Saturday in Columbia, S.C., over Georgia State of the Sun Belt Conference. They did so netting but 79 yards rushing on 32 carries.

South Carolina’s rushing defense allowed 200 Georgia State yards on 40 carries.

That doesn’t bode well against Arkansas. Coach Sam Pittman’s SEC West Razorbacks advanced by defeating then-23rd-ranked Cincinnati 31-24 last Saturday in Fayetteville. Arkansas netted 224 yards rushing on 45 carries and limited the visiting Bearcats to 113 yards rushing on 31 totes.

The Gamecocks’ offensive line and running backs took the brunt of media and fans criticism for Carolina’s anemic rushing stats.

Beamer said it’s not all on them.

“Receiver wise, we got our butts kicked on the perimeter blocking,” Beamer said. “So we all had a hand in it.”

Beamer, a fellow Georgia assistant with Pittman in 2016 and 2017 before becoming assistant head coach at Oklahoma, said South Carolina can ill afford to be “one dimensional” against the Razorbacks.

Conversely, the Razorbacks must be especially aware of the Gamecocks’ special teams. Special teams were so especially important to Frank Beamer, Shane’s father and legendary retired Virginia Tech coach, their prowess was called “Beamer Ball.”

Like father, like son.

Shane Beamer, a special teams coordinator as a South Carolina assistant from 2007-09 and Georgia in 2016 and 2017, especially masterminded special teams against Georgia State.

“They kicked an onside kick,” Pittman said. “They faked a field goal that got them first and goal on the 2. They blocked two punts for touchdowns. So special teams scored 21 points.”

South Carolina punter Kai Kroeger bailed the Gamecocks from their lack of running game by flip-flopping field position. Kroeger was named the Ray Guy Award Player of the Week averaging 49 yards on seven punts. One went for 79 yards.

Both teams should have insight into the opposing special teams strategy.

Arkansas special teams coordinator Scott Fountain was a Georgia special teams analyst when Beamer coached Georgia’s special teams in 2017. Fountain coached Georgia’s special teams in 2019 before coming with Pittman to Arkansas.

Even if their ground game again runs aground, the Gamecocks can be one dimensionally dangerous today if quarterback Spencer Rattler relives his 2020 days quarterbacking the Oklahoma Sooners.

In 2020, Rattler completed 214 of 317 passes for 3,031 yards and 28 touchdowns vs. 7 interceptions.

Rattler fell from 2021 Heisman candidate to benched, prompting him to begin 2022 anew at South Carolina.

He could relive glory days if Arkansas’ secondary, second-half vulnerable to Cincinnati’s passing game, can’t regroup from last week’s injuries to All-America safety Jalen Catalon and nickel back Myles Slusher.

Discussion

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What you need to know about the South Carolina State Fair

COLUMBIA, S.C. —The South Carolina State Fair, the state’s largest annual event, returns Oct. 12 through 23 at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds.Discount admission and ride tickets for the 153rd annual South Carolina State Fair are on sale now through Tue., Oct. 11.(Video above provided by South Carolina State Fair)Patrons can save up to 50% by purchasing S.C. State Fair tickets in advance at ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. —

The South Carolina State Fair, the state’s largest annual event, returns Oct. 12 through 23 at the South Carolina State Fairgrounds.

Discount admission and ride tickets for the 153rd annual South Carolina State Fair are on sale now through Tue., Oct. 11.

(Video above provided by South Carolina State Fair)

Patrons can save up to 50% by purchasing S.C. State Fair tickets in advance at SCStateFair.org or at a participating Circle K location.

From corn dogs and blue-ribbon roses to roller coasters and prize-winning pigs, the state fair is best known for bringing 12 days of exhibits, competitions, food, midway rides and entertainment to Columbia each October.

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“The South Carolina State Fair is truly a one-of-a-kind event with something fun and exciting for everyone,” said S.C. State Fair general manager Nancy Smith. “This year’s theme, ‘To the Fair and Beyond,’ celebrates the experiences, traditions and impact that your fair creates for not only 12 days each fall, but also year-round and beyond.”

S.C. State Fair Highlights

Discount Tickets

Discount admission tickets are $10 per person ($15-$20 during the fair) and discount ride vouchers are $30 per person ($35 -$38 during the fair). Visit SCStateFair.org or a participating Circle K location to purchase discount tickets now through Tue., Oct. 11.

Health and Safety

The S.C. State Fair is committed to providing a safe experience for its patrons. Visit SCStateFair.org to learn more about the fair’s clear bag policy, youth policy, safety guidelines, and the latest COVID-19 precautions and policies.

More information can be found at SCStateFair.org or the following social media accounts.

South Carolina OB-GYN describes practice under proposed abortion law

"I can easily go to a more progressive state and not have my entire career put on the line," said OB-GYN Natalie Gregory.COLUMBIA, S.C. — Natalie Gregory is an OB-GYN in Charleston and described what it was like practicing under South Carolina's Fetal Heartbeat Law, which passed in 2021 and took effect in June."We've had to stop and consult attorn...

"I can easily go to a more progressive state and not have my entire career put on the line," said OB-GYN Natalie Gregory.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Natalie Gregory is an OB-GYN in Charleston and described what it was like practicing under South Carolina's Fetal Heartbeat Law, which passed in 2021 and took effect in June.

"We've had to stop and consult attorneys and delay people's care while we tried to figure out if we were going to lose our medical license or go to jail if we provided the care that they needed," said Gregory.

The law criminalizes doctors who perform abortions after around six weeks. It makes exceptions for pregnancies caused by rape or incest and fatal fetal anomalies. The State's Supreme Court blocked the Measure in August. However, Gregory said she's worried about future legislation.

"These bills are written without any real explanation, that written by people who aren't physicians, so they don't understand how questions would come up," said Gregory.

She added the legal limbo and possibility of tighter restrictions may force her to leave the state.

"I can easily go to a more progressive state and not have my entire career put on the line," said Gregory.

On Thursday, South Carolina Senators approved a bill adding to the state's six-week law.

Under the amended bill, survivors of sexual assault can get an abortion up to 12 weeks of pregnancy, a reduction from the current law's 20 week exception.

A physician must report the allegations within 24 hours of the abortion to the sheriff in their county. They must also provide law enforcement with the patients name, contact information, and the DNA of the fetus.

The DNA must be turned into evidence within 90 days of being notified.

(R) @SenTomDavisSC: “yes, I am filibustering this. I'm not going to let this come to a vote unless this body votes to sit me down, because I do not think this is an equitable balancing of competing rights.” https://t.co/bPEGNkm9nS

— Becky Budds (@BeckyBuddstv) September 8, 2022

"Only 8% of cases is the assailant a stranger. So oftentimes, the person that assaults you is somebody you know, somebody you care about, and you may not want to go through that whole law enforcement, criminal justice process," said South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence Executive Director Sara Barber.

She added she believes the bill completely leaves out victims of domestic violence.

"we're hearing more and more about reproductive coercion, where women are pressured by an intimate partner not to use birth control, or stealthing, where birth control was removed halfway through the act," said Barber. "Women spend so much time trying not to get pregnant, but then often that ability is taken away from us. And this bill completely, doesn't acknowledge that as a reality."

The New bill also allows cases of Fatal Fetal Anomalies if two physicians confirm the child will not survive outside the womb.

These types of cases are fairly common, said Gregory.

"Every year, I have multiple patients that I take care of that have babies that are not expected to survive or would have a very, very poor quality of life," she said.

"I wish that they would trust one physician, because really one physician has the training that it takes," said Gregory. "But the fact that they are allowing it with two physicians, I think is a huge victory for the pro choice side."

Gregory tells News 19 even the state's 20 week abortion ban that's currently in place is limiting life saving care for mothers.

"We have a network where we can send people out of state, but they are all so incredibly overburdened right now that there's a weight," said Gregory. "We had a patient who had a baby with a heart defect, and she had to wait a month."

The proposal returns to the house, which last week passed a bill banning nearly all abortions.

If the House agrees on the Senate's changes, the bill heads to Gov. Henry McMaster's desk.

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